Teague's Tech Treks - 10 Rep Learning

Learning Technology & Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Weekend Ed. Quote~ June 27

If you ever want to know what a creative person’s mind feels like, imagine a browser with 2,857 tabs open. ALL.THE.TIME

 

 

I appreciate the ideas on this (new-to-me) blog: https://mycreativejourney2015.wordpress.com/

 

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Picture Source

More Ed. Quotes

Other posts on creativity

 

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Digital Storytelling with ePortfolios Dr. Helen Barrett

See also the Reflections for Learning Google Site: https://sites.google.com/site/reflection4learning/

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Weekend Ed. Quotes ~ June 20

There is a vitality, a life force, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and there is only one of you in all time. This expression is unique, and if you block it, it will never exist through any other medium; and be lost. The world will not have it.

It is not your business to determine how good it is, not how it compares with other expression. It is your business to keep it yours clearly and directly, to keep the channel open. You have to keep open and aware directly to the urges that motivate you. Keep the channel open.

No artist is pleased. There is no satisfaction whatever at any time. There is only a divine dissatisfaction, a blessed unrest that keeps us marching and makes us more alive than the others.

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The Library of Congress has more than one location

filmjpegDid you know that the Library of Congress has more than one location?

There is a second location for the Library of Congress in Culpeper, Virginia. It houses the Packard Campus for media conservation – http://www.loc.gov/avconservation/

A childhood friend of mine is one of the archivists and he is involved in preserving silent films. Did you know that a majority of all of the silent film script writers and directors were women? There is additional information at this film describing the films and work of the National Film Registry:
Here is the link to a trailer for the documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ea2tcWC2k0c

Here is a link to the full documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVF4BKISrI8

Well worth your time to view and learn about the great work of film preservation.

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Capstone, AD Reading List

The current Reference list on my Capstone paper is over 4 pages.

of references-

(yes, just the references!)

But I do see an end in sight, and this book is first on my list for Capstone, AD reading.

Creativity for 21st Century Skills by Jane Piirto *

creativitybook

Creativity for 21st Century Skills describes what many creative people really do when they create. It focuses on the practical applications of a theoretical approach to creativity training the author has developed.

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Piirto, J. (2011). Creativity for 21st century skills (pp. 1-12). SensePublishers.

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Happy #800th Birthday Magna Carta

The Magna Carta was the charter of liberties that England’s King John granted to his barons in 1215 in order to stop their rebellion and restore their allegiance to his throne.  The Magna Carta secured only the rights of a privileged class of the king’s subjects but it began to get people thinking about liberty for all classes of people and that the rule of law would hold prominence.

Livestreaming at 5:00pm est: A discussion on influence of Magna Carta on American constitutionalism

See the Library of Congress exhibition which ran from November, 2014 – January, 2015.

https://research.archives.gov/id/6116690

 

Read More: WHY HAS THE MAGNA CARTA LASTED? http://moreintelligentlife.com/story/history-magna-carta-revisited

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Weekend Ed. Quotes ~ June 13

Reading is escape, and the opposite of escape; it’s a way to make contact with reality after a day of making things up, and it’s a way of making contact with someone else’s imagination after a day that’s all too real. ~Nora Ephron

bookwithpinkflower

 

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More Weekend Ed. Quotes

 

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Authentic Learning

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U.S. Book Sales Up!

U.S. Book Business Generated Over $27 Billion in Net Revenue Last Year
The U.S. book and journal publishing industry created $27.98 billion in net revenue in 2014, according to the Association of American Publishers (AAP)?€?s annual StatShot. Revenues were up 4.6 percent as compared to 2013, in which annual revenues were $26.75 billion. (GalleyCat)

Total units increased 3.7 percent, hitting 2.70 billion; units in the trade category rose 4.1 percent, to 2.42 billion. The AAP includes religion publishing in the trade category, along with adult and children?€?s sales. The estimate for the entire industry is based on actual sales supplied by about 1,800 U.S. publishers for both 2013 and 2014, which the AAP then augments by using a variety of sources to estimate sales for publishers that do not report data. (Publishers Weekly)

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Juan Felipe Herrera named 21st Poet Laureate of the United States

Juan Felipe Herrera has been named as the 21st Poet Laureate of the United States in an announced appointment by James H. Billington, the Librarian of Congress. Herrera’s term will take place from 2015 to 2016. (GalleyCat)

A poet of Chicano descent, the 66-year-old has spent just about his whole life on the West Coast. Born to a family of migrant farmworkers, Herrera bounced from tent to trailer for much of his youth in Southern California, eventually studying at UCLA and Stanford.

Herrera will succeed current Poet Laureate Charles Wright. Herrera is the poet who wrote “Border-Crosser With A Lamborghini Dream” and “187 Reasons Mexicanos Can’t Cross The Border,” among many other poems. (NYT)

Herrera’s biography and a few poems are available at this link from the Poetry Foundation. Herrera’s book page is available at this Amazon link.

The laureate position involves crafting poetry projects and broadening the audience for poetry. The 2013-2014 poet laureate, Natasha Trethewey, launched a series of reports from locations nationwide for a PBS NewsHour poetry series to explore societal issues. (HuffPost / AP)

Dating back to the 1300’s in Italy where the first poet laureates were named, over a dozen countries continue the poet laureate tradition today. The first U.S. poet laureate was Joseph Auslander. Ten U.S. states also name their own poets laureate.

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