Teague's Tech Treks - 10 Rep Learning

Learning Technology & Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Flag Day

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Happy National Read Across America Day!

National Read Across America Day is an annual event that is part of Read Across America, an initiative on reading that was created by the National Education Association.

Each year, National Read Across America Day is celebrated on March 2nd, the birthday of Dr. Seuss.  However, if it falls on a weekend, it is observed in the school systems on the school day closest to March 2nd.  This day is a motivational and awareness day, calling all children and youth in every community across the United States to celebrate reading.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Pick up an interesting book and read it.  More importantly, read with a child. Use #ReadAcrossAmericaDay or #DrSeussDay to post on social media.

Parents and educators, visit the National Day Calendar Classroom for ways to incorporate National Read Across America Day into your classroom.

HISTORY

The first National Read Across America Day was held on March 2, 1998.

 

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Tech Infusion and its Potential to Mediate Online Identities

A recent ice storm caused my retreat from the roadways and outside activities. My indoor inertia was replaced with the indulgence of re-reading my online team process journals. These journals include observations, quotes of team members, ideas for future research, links to current research, and a few doodles. I remain committed to the learning power which emanates from doodles, but time to search for cooraborating research eludes me.

As I turned the paper pages of the journals a quote from an online research team member caught my attention. Our team, led by Dr. Eric Hamilton featured a conversation with Dr. Paulina Sameshima.

Dr. Sameshima’s dialogue during this particular meeting addressed how learners templatize thought for neural efficiency. Dr. Hamilton and Dr. Sameshima catelyzed a discussion on meaning-making.  My research teammate, in response said,

“We bifurcate on default”

My margin notes then echoed my astonishment at the level of understanding engendered from my research teammate. I wondered if the technological affordances of a synchronous meeting held within a communal space simultaneously shared through the online affordance of Fuze amid the separated environments of each of our individual locations coalescenced and liberated insights such as my teammate shared.

“We bifurcate on default”

There is a protection that emerges for online exchanges whether they be confined to formal learning spaces of online courses, webinars, and synchronous team meetings or informal learning spaces of chats, status updates, benchmark updates and the like. 

Both online participants and facilitators for new identities situated within the online community (Brown, et al. 1989; Ito, Kafai, Teague, 2017; Turkle, Wenger and Wenger, 2016). We may become a new version of ourself, embodying attributes of the self that are restricted or confined in the world of our face-to-face interactions. Through the participatory spontaneity of online discourse coupled with the identity safeguards of our physical environments, insights are formed and shared. Growth branches and, as Vygotsky wrote, this development precedes learning. 

 

Permenant Link: https://tinyurl.com/ParticipatoryOnlineIdentity 


Sameshima, P. (2007). Seeing red: A pedagogy of parallax: An epistolary bildungsroman on artful scholarly inquiry. Cambria Press. Amazon

 

Background polling supplemental research: As of January 2014: •  90 percent of American adults have a cell phone. •  58 percent of those have a smartphone (the number soars to nearly 80 percent for those between 18 and 49). •  42 percent have a tablet.1 It’s a truly different, more informed and more connected world. SOURCE: 1 – http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheets/mobile-technology-fact-sheet/

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Research-based support for doodling as an imprint for reading comprehension

BookClockResearch-based support for doodling as an imprint for reading comprehension

Encouraging students to journal and doodle while they read is an excellent way to strengthen comprehension (Durkin, 1978; Karten, 2017; Schott, 2011).

Research support new ways of applying what students do while they read with avenues for future instructional activities.

Journaling/Doodling/Mindmapping is a wonderful modification for students with dyslexia and/or ADD/ADHD, or those students whose reading fluency is slower.

One student in one of the high school classes I taught was very sensitive to activity, movement, changes in routine, and changes in voice. Taking notes required too much channeling of energy so we came up with the idea of doodling and mindmapping his notes. His parents were astounded at the transformation in his calmer energy level and ability to retain comprehend what he read.

Also, among the older adults I work with who have survived a stroke, doodling and visual representation of their thoughts has been described by them as “nurturing” and “like a vacation.” In addition to our course reasources, much additional research points to these same effects and I have cited three of my favorites. (Durkin, 1978; Karten, 2017; Schott, 2011).

So, build in some doodling time this week or at least before Spring Break!

#PBSReaders4Life

#PBSReaders4Life

 

References

Durkin, D. (1978). What classroom observations reveal about reading comprehension instruction. Center for the Study of Reading, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Available online at this link: https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/17858/ctrstreadtechrepv01978i00106_opt.pdf?sequence=1 

Karten, N. (2017). Doodle your way to improved focus and concentration. TechWell. Available online at this link:
https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/17858/ctrstreadtechrepv01978i00106_opt.pdf?sequence=1

Schott, G.D. (2011). Doodling and the default network of the brain. The Lancett. VOLUME 378, ISSUE 9797P1133-1134. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(11)61496-7

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Valentine’s Day Stories and Books~ Which is the All-time Best?

What’s the all-time best Valentine’s Book/Story?

For me, it’s Pride and Prejudice. Both PBS and Amazon Prime feature the best movie/mini-series version starring Colin Firth.

PBS even has background info on some of the salient narrative points. https://www.pbs.org/newshour/tag/pride-and-prejudice 

Here is a list of best Valentine’s stories for grade school kids: https://www.thoughtco.com/top-childrens-books-for-valentines-day-627613

Also, I found this list of “Sweet Stories for a Sweet Holiday”
https://www.weareteachers.com/childrens-books-to-celebrate-valentines-day/

Here is a list announcing books for children ages 1-18:
https://www.peanutblossom.com/blog/valentines-day-books/

Click here for some of the this blog’s previous Valentine’s Day posts.

What’s your favorite Valentine’s Day book?

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It’s time for Goodreads’ 2019 Reading Challenge

It’s time for Goodreads’ 2019 Reading Challenge!

Goodreads 2019 Reading Challenge

Click here to set your reading goal for the year and track your progress with the 2019 Reading Challenge. Already 941,000++ folks have made the pledge including my smart friend Donna who had pledged to read 50 books!!

Goodreads Reading Challenge Tally

There is not deadline to begin– begin anytime!!

Be sure to sign up and start reading today!

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Happy Thanksgiving from Abe and me

Happy Thanksgiving… What Thanksgiving wouldn’t be complete without Abraham Lincoln’s Thanksgiving Proclamation

I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, …, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him …, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to his tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquility and Union.”~October 3, 1863

HappyTeagueThanksgiving

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Reference

Lincoln and Thanksgiving (2016). Retrieved from: https://www.nps.gov/liho/learn/historyculture/lincoln-and-thanksgiving.htm

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Pre-Thanksgiving Fall Leaves STEM & STEAM Lesson Ideas- Lesson Deliverable

In yesterday’s post, ideas and resources for STEM and STEAM integration for lessons on seasons were explained. Here is the Thinglink resource described in the STEM lesson integration on “Why Do Leaves Change?” Scroll over the image and click on the little black and white circles to view curriculum components.

 

#HarnessingImagination

 

 

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Pre-Thanksgiving Fall Leaves STEM & STEAM Lesson Ideas

 

We returned from #CCEFinland to full-out fall leaves courtesy of a sudden freeze while we were away. Keeping to our presentation theme of #HarnessingImagination, we brainstormed some lesson ideas while we raked the leaves and gathered components for our Thanksgiving centerpiece.

Teachable Moments, like turkey giblets, are never wasted. For a STEM connection, I can use the photos along with information from ESF State University of New York to form the basis of a ThingLink scavenger hunt on the science behind why leaves turn different colors in fall.  ThinkLink Inc. is a Finnish-American in-image app created in 2010 by Ulla Engeström and Janne Jalkanen. Depending on time limitations (and how compelling the Black Friday sales are), I can ask students to either complete the Scavenger Hunt that I create or they can add their own components. 

Question 1: What design elements would you add to this lesson?
Question 2: What standards does this lesson address?

Please leave a comment with your ideas.

The leaves transformed the lawn to a carpet of color. For a STEAM connection, I can use the photos of the multi-color lawn as a palette for student composed poetry/haiku. After reading and discussing the technique of haiku from the Australian Writers’ Centre, student teams can take turns writing alternating lines of the poem or haiku. Alternately, students can choose to work solo on their poem/haiku.

Question 3: What design elements would you add to this lesson?
Question 4: What standards does this lesson address?

Please leave a comment with your ideas.

Tomorrow’s post will feature the STEM lesson Thinglink deliverable. Click here to view.

All of the outside color found a place on our Thanksgiving table with our Fall Centerpiece of Safflower blossoms, garden parsley, rosemary, and chives. A little glitter spray paint glammed up some of the outside English laurel leaves.

 

 

References:

#HarnessingImagination

Australian Writers’ Centre, (2018, April 19). 19 Haiku poems about Autumn. Retrieved from
https://www.writerscentre.com.au/blog/19-haiku-poems-about-autumn/

College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York (2018). Why Leaves
Change Color
. Retrieved from: https://www.esf.edu/pubprog/brochure/leaves/leaves.htm

All photos by Teague

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Primary Sources in the News!

Click this Link for the AP News Story

Click on the link for a Common Core correlated study guide from the Library of Congress —common_core LOC-1osmerk

Common Core Standards:
ELA, History, 6-8, 9:    Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.1
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.3
Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.5
Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.6
Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.7
Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.8
Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.9
Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.

 


More posts referencing Primary Sources

#PBSReaders4Life

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