Teague's Tech Treks

Learning Technology and other Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Our PBS Course Has Ended: Now What?

Our  PBS course concluded last night and, even after 12 years of course facilitation, I miss you all.

Here, I make my pitch for dedicated educators, parents (and especially parents who are educators!) to get very involved in your local school politics. The school board, the local teacher representation board, the local PTA are excellent ways to navigate your local education system and provide your expertise.

All: please consider yourself nominated by me, for your next level of educational service!!

Dr. T 🙂

 

#PBSReaders4Life

#PBSReaders4Life

@PBSTeachers

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Considering the concept of eBooks for younger learners

This week in our PBSTeacherLine course, Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits, we are reading about, thinking about, and digitally posting about electronic books. We’re firing up our Kindles- it promises to be a page-turner!

After exploring the pros and cons of electronic books you will learn where and how to find free eBooks, identify the skills your students need to be able to use them, and explore a wealth of resources that help you integrate them into the classroom. Here are a couple of link edits to note:

#PBSReaders4Life   #PBSTeachers

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Fun Facts About Hashtags

As a pre-course activity for my PBS TeacherLine class, “Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits” I constructed a hashtag survey. The intent of the survey was for the class to create, vote, and decide on a common hashtag for us to use during our class.

Here are a few fun hashtag facts that I learned in the process:

Engagement Benefits from Hashtags…Sometimes: Posts with 1-2 hashtags have 21% more interest and by extension, more engagement than those without hashtags (Andersen, 2018; Lee, 2018).

 


 

The carbon dating for the first hashtag is circa 2007:

Source: https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/everything-you-need-to-know-about-hashtags/517028/

 


 

Hashtag Tips from Social Media experts:

  1. Learn from the best- look at the posts of folks you admire or influencers and scroll to see the hashtags they use
  2. Consider related hashtags
  3. Identify hashtags that resonate with you
  4. Proofread your hashtag to make sure it is not being used in a different (or gasp-worthy) context
  5. Only use 1-2 hashtags for maximum engagement from your readers (Anderson, 2018)

Best quote related to hashtagging and social media: The currency of social media is the share. ~Courtney Seiter


There’s even a podcast dedicated to the humble hashtag called– The Science of Social Media


 

Because their purpose is to expand the conversation, Hashtags hug constructivist learning theory.

Source: https://blog.bufferapp.com/a-scientific-guide-to-hashtags-which-ones-work-when-and-how-many


 

Keep practicing your hashtag I.Q. and you will be ready for the next World Social Media day on June 30, 2019

SocialMediaDay

The hashtag for this day is, natch, #SMDay

Happy Hashtagging!!


 

 

References

Andersen, I. (February 15, 2018). Everything you’ve always wanted to know about hashtags. Social Media Today. Retrieved from: https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/everything-you-need-to-know-about-hashtags/517028/ 

Lee, K. (April 17, 2018). How to Use Hashtags How Many, Best Ones, and Where to Use Them. Buffer Blog. Retrieved from: https://blog.bufferapp.com/a-scientific-guide-to-hashtags-which-ones-work-when-and-how-many

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Welcome to PBS Course RDLA235- Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits K-12

Welcome to “Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits K-12” from PBS TeacherLine @pbsteachers.

Looking forward to learning with you!!

Please give a listen to my Welcome VoiceThread (no worries to Ken Burns or any Audible book narrator!)

 

 

Now, click over to our course and begin orientation!

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PBS Course RDLA235 Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits Begins Tomorrow!! Still time to sign up!

PBS Course RDLA235 Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits Begins Tomorrow!! Still time to sign up, click here

RDLA235 Splash Page

 

Please join us!

@PBSTeachers

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The U.S. Library of Congress Delivers! Wimbledon Resources from the LOC!

Part 1: 
Part 1: In honor of Wimbledon For my online learners in the Research from the Library of Congress course …and online friends  [Billie Jean King playing tennis at Wimbledon] | Library of Congress –
https://www.loc.gov/item/96500937/
Part 2: In honor of Wimbledon- For my online learners in the Research from the Library of Congress course …and online friends- from the Library of Congress –
Library of Congress Wimbledon resource
Photo Source: https://cdn.loc.gov/service/pnp/pga/06500/06587_150px.jpg
See the Tweets! Click Here

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Our PBS Course has finished… now what?

Our  PBS course concluded last night and, even after 12 years of course facilitation, I miss you all.

Here, I make my pitch for dedicated educators, parents (and especially parents who are educators!) to get very involved in your local school politics. The school board, the local teacher representation board, the local PTA are excellent ways to navigate your local education system and provide your expertise.

All: please consider yourself nominated by me, for your next level of educational service!!

Dr. T 🙂

 

 

 

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Tips for exemplary online discussion posts

Take a walk with me as we discuss tips for exemplary discussion posts.


 

Looking forward to reading your posts!!

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Learning Technologies Podcast – April 10- Primary Sources and their Use in Digital Reading

Learning Technologies Podcast – April 10- Primary Sources and their Use in Digital Reading

 

2:55

Podcast Transcript:

Welcome to the Learning Technologies Podcast. Today’s topic is … Primary Resources and their Use in Online Courses. This podcast occurs in conjunction with my facilitation of PBS TeacherLine’s Online Course in Digital Reading.
Primary sources are the raw materials of history — they are the original documents and objects which were created at the time under study. They are different from secondary sources, accounts or interpretations of events created by someone without experience. Examining primary sources gives students a powerful sense of history and the complexity of the past. Helping students analyze primary sources can also guide them toward higher-order thinking and better critical thinking and analysis skills.

Resources matter. How we reflect on them matters too. Sometimes our students get caught up in their impression of what is said and who is saying it. They mix their opinion of the source with what the person may or may not be trying to communicate. But students of Historiography tell us this does not change the efficacy of the resource itself.

For example, last year, there was a renewed interest in Ireland on the events of the 1916 Easter Rising, also referred to as the Rising. Researchers are returning to primary sources such as journals, diaries, death records, and cemetery listings to discover that many more people died than previously thought in the uprising for Irish Independence from Britain. One historian, Ray Bateson continues to search for a comprehensive listing of the previously unrecognized heroes of the Rising. Although records of the Irish Easter Rising are scant in the United States’ Library of Congress, they are included and it is significant to note that the importance of Primary Resources is part of global endeavors. 

Perhaps the best benefit of online courses is the time given (and even encouraged) for reflection and consideration. So, consider with me- Is there a place for primary sources in courses delivered online and, if so, what does this mean for citing sources and pointing students to primary sources?

Thank you for considering these questions with me. I enjoy learning from you! Please leave a comment in our Week 3 discussion board to keep the discussion going.

(This podcast Created using Audacity) 
Additional Resources from Edublogs

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Great start to our Spring Digital Reading Course from PBS TeacherLine

We’ve had a great orientation to our Spring Digital Reading Course from PBS TeacherLine. It’s been great to virtually meet each of you! I have enjoyed getting to know you in our Introduction Forums. We are all connecting and learning, each from a different U.S. state at times that are most convenient for us.

Today begins our first week! I so appreciate the emphasis this week on the Joyful aspect of Reading. Please check your email or the course Emails Forum for my Week 1 Tips Email.

I am taking the idea of Joyful reading to heart and this Friday, I am scheduling a “Read Only” morning. I plan to turn off all technology and read! (Good thing I’m on Spring Break or it would be curtains at the university!)

Reading is one of the joys of life

 

Image Source Link

 

 

 

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