Teague's Tech Treks

Learning Technology and other Tech Observations by Dr, Helen Teague

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Learning Technologies Podcast – April 10- Primary Sources and their Use in Digital Reading

Learning Technologies Podcast – April 10- Primary Sources and their Use in Digital Reading

 

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Podcast Transcript:

Welcome to the Learning Technologies Podcast. Today’s topic is … Primary Resources and their Use in Online Courses. This podcast occurs in conjunction with my facilitation of PBS TeacherLine’s Online Course in Digital Reading.
Primary sources are the raw materials of history — they are the original documents and objects which were created at the time under study. They are different from secondary sources, accounts or interpretations of events created by someone without experience. Examining primary sources gives students a powerful sense of history and the complexity of the past. Helping students analyze primary sources can also guide them toward higher-order thinking and better critical thinking and analysis skills.

Resources matter. How we reflect on them matters too. Sometimes our students get caught up in their impression of what is said and who is saying it. They mix their opinion of the source with what the person may or may not be trying to communicate. But students of Historiography tell us this does not change the efficacy of the resource itself.

For example, last year, there was a renewed interest in Ireland on the events of the 1916 Easter Rising, also referred to as the Rising. Researchers are returning to primary sources such as journals, diaries, death records, and cemetery listings to discover that many more people died than previously thought in the uprising for Irish Independence from Britain. One historian, Ray Bateson continues to search for a comprehensive listing of the previously unrecognized heroes of the Rising. Although records of the Irish Easter Rising are scant in the United States’ Library of Congress, they are included and it is significant to note that the importance of Primary Resources is part of global endeavors. 

Perhaps the best benefit of online courses is the time given (and even encouraged) for reflection and consideration. So, consider with me- Is there a place for primary sources in courses delivered online and, if so, what does this mean for citing sources and pointing students to primary sources?

Thank you for considering these questions with me. I enjoy learning from you! Please leave a comment in our Week 3 discussion board to keep the discussion going.

(This podcast Created using Audacity) 
Additional Resources from Edublogs

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Great start to our Spring Digital Reading Course from PBS TeacherLine

We’ve had a great orientation to our Spring Digital Reading Course from PBS TeacherLine. It’s been great to virtually meet each of you! I have enjoyed getting to know you in our Introduction Forums. We are all connecting and learning, each from a different U.S. state at times that are most convenient for us.

Today begins our first week! I so appreciate the emphasis this week on the Joyful aspect of Reading. Please check your email or the course Emails Forum for my Week 1 Tips Email.

I am taking the idea of Joyful reading to heart and this Friday, I am scheduling a “Read Only” morning. I plan to turn off all technology and read! (Good thing I’m on Spring Break or it would be curtains at the university!)

Reading is one of the joys of life

 

Image Source Link

 

 

 

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PBS Course Announcement: Week 1 Ending

An Announcement for PBS Learners in my course:
Made with ToonyTool.com
 

 

 

Created using ToonyTool, www.ToonyTool.com

 

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RDLA400 Course Calendar

Developing Passionate Readers in a Digital Age

 

ourcoursecalendar

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The Learning Potential of e-Books Lotta Larson

The Learning Potential of e-Books Lotta Larson

The Learning Potential of e-Books Lotta Larson

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PBS Course: Our Course Calendar

PBS TeacherLine Course: Teaching with Primary Sources from the Library of Congress

Our Course Calendar

Week 1: July 13 – 19
Week 2: July 20 – 26
Week 3: July 27 – August 2
Week 4: August 3 – August 9
Week 5: August 10 – August 16
Week 6: August 17 – August 23

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Primary Resources Matter

A Concluding Post for my PBS TeacherLine Online Course “Teaching With Primary Sources from the Library of Congress”:

Primary sources are the raw materials of history — original documents and objects which were created at the time under study. They are different from secondary sources, accounts or interpretations of events created by someone without experience. Examining primary sources gives students a powerful sense of history and the complexity of the past. Helping students analyze primary sources can also guide them toward higher-order thinking and better critical thinking and analysis skills.

Resources matter. How we reflect on them matters too. Sometimes our students get caught up in their impression of what is said and who is saying it. They mix their opinion of the source with source definition. But students of Historiography tell us this does not change the efficacy of the resource itself.

Bateson photoFor example, there has been a renewed interest here in Ireland on the events of the 1916 Easter Rising, also referred to as the Rising. Researchers are returning to primary sources such as journals, diaries, death records, and cemetery listings to discover that many more people died than previously thought in the uprising for Irish Independence from Britain. One historian, Ray Bateson continues to search for a comprehensive listing of the previously unrecognized heroes of the Rising (see photo below). Although records of the Irish Easter Rising are scant in the United States’ Library of Congress, it is significant to note that the importance of Primary Resources is part of global endeavors. 

Perhaps the best benefit of online courses is the time given (even encouraged) for reflection and consideration. How many times have I sat in a face-to-face classroom listening to the discussion and then as soon as I get to my car an idea screams to be included, but class is already over. Is that just my singular experience?

In Week 3, we will look at whether resources have to be codified only as Primary and Secondary. Wonderful insights and information this week! Looking forward to continuing on to Week 3!!!

Helen

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The Library of Congress has more than one location

filmjpegDid you know that the Library of Congress has more than one location?

There is a second location for the Library of Congress in Culpeper, Virginia. It houses the Packard Campus for media conservation – http://www.loc.gov/avconservation/

A childhood friend of mine is one of the archivists and he is involved in preserving silent films. Did you know that a majority of all of the silent film script writers and directors were women? There is additional information at this film describing the films and work of the National Film Registry:
Here is the link to a trailer for the documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ea2tcWC2k0c

Here is a link to the full documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVF4BKISrI8

Well worth your time to view and learn about the great work of film preservation.

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PBS Course Emails Archived on the Tech Treks Blog

This term, I’ll archive course emails here for easier retrieval. Great when you are away from email but need to remember an important course component. Feel free to comment here with questions.

Our Course: INST342.34 – Teaching with Primary Sources from the Library of Congress

Course Calendar:

Orientation: July 7 – July 9

Week 1: July 9 – July 15

Week 2: July 16 – July 22

Week 3: July 23 – July 29

Week 4: July 30 – August 5

Week 5: August 6 – August 12

Week 6: August 13- August 19

 

Important Links:
PBS Teacherline: http://www.pbs.org/teacherline/

Library of Congress Exhibitions

Main Library of Congress website

Assignment Checklist

 

 

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