Teague's Tech Treks

Learning Technology and other Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Tech Infusion and its Potential to Mediate Online Identities

A recent ice storm caused my retreat from the roadways and outside activities. My indoor inertia was replaced with the indulgence of re-reading my online team process journals. These journals include observations, quotes of team members, ideas for future research, links to current research, and a few doodles. I remain committed to the learning power which emanates from doodles, but time to search for cooraborating research eludes me.

As I turned the paper pages of the journals a quote from an online research team member caught my attention. Our team, led by Dr. Eric Hamilton featured a conversation with Dr. Paulina Sameshima.

Dr. Sameshima’s dialogue during this particular meeting addressed how learners templatize thought for neural efficiency. Dr. Hamilton and Dr. Sameshima catelyzed a discussion on meaning-making.  My research teammate, in response said,

“We bifurcate on default”

My margin notes then echoed my astonishment at the level of understanding engendered from my research teammate. I wondered if the technological affordances of a synchronous meeting held within a communal space simultaneously shared through the online affordance of Fuze amid the separated environments of each of our individual locations coalescenced and liberated insights such as my teammate shared.

“We bifurcate on default”

There is a protection that emerges for online exchanges whether they be confined to formal learning spaces of online courses, webinars, and synchronous team meetings or informal learning spaces of chats, status updates, benchmark updates and the like. 

Both online participants and facilitators for new identities situated within the online community (Brown, et al. 1989; Ito, Kafai, Teague, 2017; Turkle, Wenger and Wenger, 2016). We may become a new version of ourself, embodying attributes of the self that are restricted or confined in the world of our face-to-face interactions. Through the participatory spontaneity of online discourse coupled with the identity safeguards of our physical environments, insights are formed and shared. Growth branches and, as Vygotsky wrote, this development precedes learning. 

 

Permenant Link: https://tinyurl.com/ParticipatoryOnlineIdentity 


Sameshima, P. (2007). Seeing red: A pedagogy of parallax: An epistolary bildungsroman on artful scholarly inquiry. Cambria Press. Amazon

 

Background polling supplemental research: As of January 2014: •  90 percent of American adults have a cell phone. •  58 percent of those have a smartphone (the number soars to nearly 80 percent for those between 18 and 49). •  42 percent have a tablet.1 It’s a truly different, more informed and more connected world. SOURCE: 1 – http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheets/mobile-technology-fact-sheet/

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NSF STEM for All -Carry our Culture

This project, represented so artfully by Jenna Welsh’s creative skill is one part of the interaction – the other equally important part of the communication is the comments (156 of them!) related to the video’s message. We carry our culture in our language and with this project, since our language is mathematics and technology – we share a common culture!  Here is a word cloud of the key words* that we have generated together in this forum.

 

NSF discussion word frequency

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NSF STEM for All Showcase Goes Live May 14-21, 2018

For one week, starting Monday, May 14 -21, the STEM for All Showcase, highlighting various NSF-funded projects advancing STEM education, will be fully activated for engagement. This is a great way to see thinking in action and the interesting projects going on across the globe.
Check out our research team’s video May 14 – 21st… you may want to visit periodically, contribute to the comments and ask questions. The comments will only be active during this week.
IC4 STEM for All Video

Here is Information on the Research

Research on an International Network for STEM Media Making and Student-Led Participatory Teaching

How does collaborative STEM project-based learning change when the participating students represent fundamentally distinct cultures, countries, economic, and social backgrounds, and work together over synchronous and asynchronous internet settings?

Does the use of videoconferencing in such STEM project-based learning settings alter intersubjectivity or shared meaning in ways that might have broad social impact?

Differences in where people live and in our cultures factor deeply into social and economic fractures in US and global society. Can students working together across such boundaries experience virtual presence and shared meaning-making through project collaborations in ways that allow deeper appreciation of each other’s differences, and reduce such fractures?

Does such collaboration from the context and comfort of one’s own cultural settings helped to neutralize anxiety and distrust of others, and in ways that are promising for the next generation learning settings that will feature more abundant international collaboration at middle and secondary school levels?

Featuring students who collaborate with one another from sixteen sites in the US, Kenya, Finland, Namibia, Mexico, Iran, and India, the IC4 project explores the intersection of learning, culture, and collaboration. Supported by NSF’s AISL Program, the project provides an international, collaborative, and digital makerspace that explores these questions and seeks to understand how student learning changes when collaborating teams identify themselves as teachers seeking to help peers understand STEM topics.

NSF Awards: 1612824

IC4 Research Team


Also, check out other projects in the Showcase, at least two or three, and provide some comments to them. Dialogue and exchange adds to our awareness of innovations in our learning landscape.

 

 

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Helping High School Researchers Develop Questioning and Research Skills- IC4 Research

Several action item requests emerged from the recent IC4 Advisory Board meeting. One of the action items came from teachers who noted that high school students needed opportunities to develop research skills in other courses besides ELA and the traditional research paper project.

I am working on just such a resource. One of the main starting points for all research is the ability to wonder and then turn wonder into an essential research question.

Given that most students learn best from visual resources, I’m using the StoryboardThat app to create the masthead for the emerging researchers resource.

 

ResearchPageMastheadTeague

 

 

More posts featuring IC4 Research

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Mathematics and Technology Coalesce in IC4 Research Themes

After our team meeting, with both face-to-face and virtual participation from teachers, graduate students, professors, team leaders, and students, the following themes appeared across the transcripts of digital notes:

Day1WordCloudOfGoogleSpreadsheetNotes

 

More posts featuring IC4 Research

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Mathematics and Technology Coalesce in IC4 Research

The catalytic component of mathematics instruction and video technology makes great strides in learning for high school students, thanks to the NSF-sponsored research of the IC4 team, directed by Dr. Eric Hamilton, principal investigator.

IC4TeamTeague

 

 

More posts featuring IC4 Research

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Weekend Ed. Quote~ September 29

“It is important for the school to wrap around the learner, rather than to have the learner wrap around the school.”
~Dr. Eric Hamilton, PhD, Pepperdine University

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More Weekend Ed. Quotes

#STEM

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