Teague's Tech Treks

Learning Technology and other Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Live Tweeting During Upcoming Literacy Webinar

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EdWeb Early Literacy Webinar — Join Me

Please join my colleague Dr. Joyce King and me for our EdWeb Webinar, “How Early Literacy Impacts Reading to Learn: Research, Strategies, and Digital Tools.

April 10, 2019- 4:00pm -5:00pm EDT

Click on this link for your free webinar registration: https://home.edweb.net/webinar/literacy20190410/ 

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Research-based support for doodling as an imprint for reading comprehension

BookClockResearch-based support for doodling as an imprint for reading comprehension

Encouraging students to journal and doodle while they read is an excellent way to strengthen comprehension (Durkin, 1978; Karten, 2017; Schott, 2011).

Research support new ways of applying what students do while they read with avenues for future instructional activities.

Journaling/Doodling/Mindmapping is a wonderful modification for students with dyslexia and/or ADD/ADHD, or those students whose reading fluency is slower.

One student in one of the high school classes I taught was very sensitive to activity, movement, changes in routine, and changes in voice. Taking notes required too much channeling of energy so we came up with the idea of doodling and mindmapping his notes. His parents were astounded at the transformation in his calmer energy level and ability to retain comprehend what he read.

Also, among the older adults I work with who have survived a stroke, doodling and visual representation of their thoughts has been described by them as “nurturing” and “like a vacation.” In addition to our course reasources, much additional research points to these same effects and I have cited three of my favorites. (Durkin, 1978; Karten, 2017; Schott, 2011).

So, build in some doodling time this week or at least before Spring Break!

#PBSReaders4Life

#PBSReaders4Life

 

References

Durkin, D. (1978). What classroom observations reveal about reading comprehension instruction. Center for the Study of Reading, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Available online at this link: https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/17858/ctrstreadtechrepv01978i00106_opt.pdf?sequence=1 

Karten, N. (2017). Doodle your way to improved focus and concentration. TechWell. Available online at this link:
https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/17858/ctrstreadtechrepv01978i00106_opt.pdf?sequence=1

Schott, G.D. (2011). Doodling and the default network of the brain. The Lancett. VOLUME 378, ISSUE 9797P1133-1134. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(11)61496-7

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Our PBS Course Has Ended: Now What?

Our  PBS course concluded last night and, even after 12 years of course facilitation, I miss you all.

Here, I make my pitch for dedicated educators, parents (and especially parents who are educators!) to get very involved in your local school politics. The school board, the local teacher representation board, the local PTA are excellent ways to navigate your local education system and provide your expertise.

All: please consider yourself nominated by me, for your next level of educational service!!

Dr. T 🙂

 

#PBSReaders4Life

#PBSReaders4Life

@PBSTeachers

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Fun Halloween Resources Post 2

THE Library of Congress scares up October 31st fun with “Frankenreads,” a public read-athon of Marry Shelley’s “Frankenstein” now 200 years young!

The reading begins at 9:00 am at the Library of Congress. It is open to everybody.

There is also a livestream so you and your students can join the fun virtually. Check out the live-stream @ the LOC’s YouTube site: 

Classroom Activities During the live stream:

  1. Students can listen and read along
  2. Students can listen for a few minutes at a time and then complete a Think-Pair-Share
  3. Students can create a word cloud of key terms
  4. (Older) Students can live-tweet to the Library of Congress during the read-athon. The event hashtag is 
  5. Studenst can draw a continuous mural or desktop mural while listening during the read-athon
  6.  … Share your ideas!

!

#PBSReaders4Life

 


More Halloween Posts

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Fun Halloween Resources Post 1

Bring the spookiness of Halloween to your classroom all month with science, math, and social studies resources for all grades on PBS LearningMedia-

https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/collection/the-halloween-collection/ 

Carve Halloween Into Your Lesson Planning– Halloween is a great time for teachers to encourage children’s imagination and creativity. Explore a collection that offers PreK-12 teachers an easy way to integrate Halloween themes into your classroom. Explore Collection–PBS Learning Media Lesson Plans Link

 


See more on Twitter: @pbsteachers

Photo link: Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/12707238@N00/22622863856/

#PBSReaders4Life

 


More Halloween Posts

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Up Close & Canvas: Link Checker

PBS Teachers

 

PBS TeacherLine uses the Canvas Learning Management System for its full array of online undergrad and graduate courses. Here are some tips shared among us in our course faculty forum.

 

 


 

In the cyclical nature of online courses, it can be a full semester or a year between administrations of the same course.

Before each administration, it is imperative to check external links to content.

This used to be an mind-numbing exercise.

via GIPHY

 

Within the Canvas LMS, there is a tool to automatically check external links. It’s called the Link Validation Tool.

Here is the path:  Go to Settings (course navigation list at very bottom) & then choose “Validate Links in Context” & then “Start Link Validation.”

Happy Canvassing!

@PBSTeachers #PBSReaders4Life


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More Up Close & Canvas Posts

 

 

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Considering the concept of eBooks for younger learners

This week in our PBSTeacherLine course, Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits, we are reading about, thinking about, and digitally posting about electronic books. We’re firing up our Kindles- it promises to be a page-turner!

After exploring the pros and cons of electronic books you will learn where and how to find free eBooks, identify the skills your students need to be able to use them, and explore a wealth of resources that help you integrate them into the classroom. Here are a couple of link edits to note:

#PBSReaders4Life   #PBSTeachers

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Crowdsourcing a course hashtag

For our @PBSTeachers course “Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits K-12″ an activity application for qualitative information gathering was implemented using an online survey tool to crowdsource a course hashtag.   

The online survey tool, SurveyAnyplace was chosen to build, distribute, and collect the results of the survey because of its ease of use, mobile tech option, survey creation templates, QR-Code distribution feature, and results display capacity. Learners were invited to participate through email and course announcements in CanvasLMS.

Here is a screenshot in the early minutes of Survey data collection:

SurveyAnyplace Survey Screen

SurveyAnyplace Survey Screen. Survey created by Helen Teague

 

The survey contained one question with 3 fixed answer choices (“A,” “B,” “C”) and 1 open-ended answer choice (“D”). The open ended answer choice “D” invited course participants to suggest their own hashtag for inclusion.

Five days were given for the first round of choice. Data provided by SurveyAnyplace detailed the response rate and tallied the responses. The survey had an 89% response rate.

In the first round, after the course learners completed the survey, the choice with the most responses and the suggested response were distilled to a final survey. Data collection on these two choices continued for three days. The resulting choice earned the designation of the Course Hashtag.

#PBSReaders4Life

The Hashtag data collection activity served to crowdsource a common hashtag, build community among all course participants (learners and course facilitator), and model procedure for an upcoming data collection culminating activity.

Course participants were assured that all future posts with the hashtag #PBSReaders4Life would always conform to the Terms of Use of each and every social media site in which it appeared. Further, course facilitators’ posts were assured to be of a general or thematic nature. Specific learners’ names would not be used, accept in the case of a retweet where a learner self-identified through the use of the hashtag #PBSReaders4Life.

 

 

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