Teague's Tech Treks

Learning Technology and other Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Up Close & Canvas: Link Checker

PBS Teachers

 

PBS TeacherLine uses the Canvas Learning Management System for its full array of online undergrad and graduate courses. Here are some tips shared among us in our course faculty forum.

 

 


 

In the cyclical nature of online courses, it can be a full semester or a year between administrations of the same course.

Before each administration, it is imperative to check external links to content.

This used to be an mind-numbing exercise.

via GIPHY

 

Within the Canvas LMS, there is a tool to automatically check external links. It’s called the Link Validation Tool.

Here is the path:  Go to Settings (course navigation list at very bottom) & then choose “Validate Links in Context” & then “Start Link Validation.”

Happy Canvassing!

@PBSTeachers #PBSReaders4Life


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Considering the concept of eBooks for younger learners

This week in our PBSTeacherLine course, Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits, we are reading about, thinking about, and digitally posting about electronic books. We’re firing up our Kindles- it promises to be a page-turner!

After exploring the pros and cons of electronic books you will learn where and how to find free eBooks, identify the skills your students need to be able to use them, and explore a wealth of resources that help you integrate them into the classroom. Here are a couple of link edits to note:

#PBSReaders4Life   #PBSTeachers

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Crowdsourcing a course hashtag

For our @PBSTeachers course “Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits K-12″ an activity application for qualitative information gathering was implemented using an online survey tool to crowdsource a course hashtag.   

The online survey tool, SurveyAnyplace was chosen to build, distribute, and collect the results of the survey because of its ease of use, mobile tech option, survey creation templates, QR-Code distribution feature, and results display capacity. Learners were invited to participate through email and course announcements in CanvasLMS.

Here is a screenshot in the early minutes of Survey data collection:

SurveyAnyplace Survey Screen

SurveyAnyplace Survey Screen. Survey created by Helen Teague

 

The survey contained one question with 3 fixed answer choices (“A,” “B,” “C”) and 1 open-ended answer choice (“D”). The open ended answer choice “D” invited course participants to suggest their own hashtag for inclusion.

Five days were given for the first round of choice. Data provided by SurveyAnyplace detailed the response rate and tallied the responses. The survey had an 89% response rate.

In the first round, after the course learners completed the survey, the choice with the most responses and the suggested response were distilled to a final survey. Data collection on these two choices continued for three days. The resulting choice earned the designation of the Course Hashtag.

#PBSReaders4Life

The Hashtag data collection activity served to crowdsource a common hashtag, build community among all course participants (learners and course facilitator), and model procedure for an upcoming data collection culminating activity.

Course participants were assured that all future posts with the hashtag #PBSReaders4Life would always conform to the Terms of Use of each and every social media site in which it appeared. Further, course facilitators’ posts were assured to be of a general or thematic nature. Specific learners’ names would not be used, accept in the case of a retweet where a learner self-identified through the use of the hashtag #PBSReaders4Life.

 

 

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Fun Facts About Hashtags

As a pre-course activity for my PBS TeacherLine class, “Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits” I constructed a hashtag survey. The intent of the survey was for the class to create, vote, and decide on a common hashtag for us to use during our class.

Here are a few fun hashtag facts that I learned in the process:

Engagement Benefits from Hashtags…Sometimes: Posts with 1-2 hashtags have 21% more interest and by extension, more engagement than those without hashtags (Andersen, 2018; Lee, 2018).

 


 

The carbon dating for the first hashtag is circa 2007:

Source: https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/everything-you-need-to-know-about-hashtags/517028/

 


 

Hashtag Tips from Social Media experts:

  1. Learn from the best- look at the posts of folks you admire or influencers and scroll to see the hashtags they use
  2. Consider related hashtags
  3. Identify hashtags that resonate with you
  4. Proofread your hashtag to make sure it is not being used in a different (or gasp-worthy) context
  5. Only use 1-2 hashtags for maximum engagement from your readers (Anderson, 2018)

Best quote related to hashtagging and social media: The currency of social media is the share. ~Courtney Seiter


There’s even a podcast dedicated to the humble hashtag called– The Science of Social Media


 

Because their purpose is to expand the conversation, Hashtags hug constructivist learning theory.

Source: https://blog.bufferapp.com/a-scientific-guide-to-hashtags-which-ones-work-when-and-how-many


 

Keep practicing your hashtag I.Q. and you will be ready for the next World Social Media day on June 30, 2019

SocialMediaDay

The hashtag for this day is, natch, #SMDay

Happy Hashtagging!!


 

 

References

Andersen, I. (February 15, 2018). Everything you’ve always wanted to know about hashtags. Social Media Today. Retrieved from: https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/everything-you-need-to-know-about-hashtags/517028/ 

Lee, K. (April 17, 2018). How to Use Hashtags How Many, Best Ones, and Where to Use Them. Buffer Blog. Retrieved from: https://blog.bufferapp.com/a-scientific-guide-to-hashtags-which-ones-work-when-and-how-many

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Welcome to PBS Course RDLA235- Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits K-12

Welcome to “Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits K-12” from PBS TeacherLine @pbsteachers.

Looking forward to learning with you!!

Please give a listen to my Welcome VoiceThread (no worries to Ken Burns or any Audible book narrator!)

 

 

Now, click over to our course and begin orientation!

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PBS Course RDLA235 Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits Begins Tomorrow!! Still time to sign up!

PBS Course RDLA235 Teaching Lifelong Reading Habits Begins Tomorrow!! Still time to sign up, click here

RDLA235 Splash Page

 

Please join us!

@PBSTeachers

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PBS Learning Media ~ New Site Design

PBS LearningMedia is excited to announce an improved site design and user experience, making our resources easier than ever for teachers like you to find and integrate into your curriculum. These new features, which are based on feedback from educators nationwide, include: a refreshed look and feel, the ability to easily browse by curriculum area, standards and grade bands, improved search functionality, and easier access to resources from your local PBS station. Explore the Site

 

https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/

https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/

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Happy National Read a Book Day – September 6

September 6th is National Read a Book Day!! Happy NRaB Day, Page Turners!!

 

Celebrate National Read a Book Day and vote for your favorite novels on The Great American Read from PBS (now through Oct 18). You can vote daily. Learn more at this link:  http://www.pbs.org/the-great-american-read/home/    and these hashtags:

#GreatReadPBS     @pbsteachers 

http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/love-read.jpg

http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/love-read.jpg

 

There are four ways to vote: online, on Twitter or Facebook, by SMS, and, beginning September 11th, by phone. To vote online, click the vote link for your book of choice. To vote on Twitter or Facebook, tweet or post the hashtag. Explore the list below and vote for your favorites or find the voting hashtags here to vote on social media and SMS. The full voting details are available here. To learn more about voting, visit here.

Decorate your classroom with America’s favorite books! Check out printable posters & quote cards from .

Here is a link to the full ballot: https://bento.cdn.pbs.org/hostedbento-prod/filer_public/gar-phase-2/assets/TGAR_BookChecklist_2018.pdf 

 

Image Links

http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/love-read.jpg

https://goo.gl/images/j2k62U

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Vote for your favorite novels on The Great American Read from PBS

Vote for your favorite novels on The Great American Read from PBS (now through Oct 18). You can vote daily. Learn more at this link:  http://www.pbs.org/the-great-american-read/home/    and these hashtags:

#GreatReadPBS     @pbsteachers 

http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/love-read.jpg

http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/love-read.jpg

 

There are four ways to vote: online, on Twitter or Facebook, by SMS, and, beginning September 11th, by phone. To vote online, click the vote link for your book of choice. To vote on Twitter or Facebook, tweet or post the hashtag. Explore the list below and vote for your favorites or find the voting hashtags here to vote on social media and SMS. The full voting details are available here. To learn more about voting, visit here.

Decorate your classroom with America’s favorite books! Check out printable posters & quote cards from .

Here is a link to the full ballot: https://bento.cdn.pbs.org/hostedbento-prod/filer_public/gar-phase-2/assets/TGAR_BookChecklist_2018.pdf 

 

Image Links

http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/love-read.jpg

https://goo.gl/images/j2k62U

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Up Close & Canvas: SpeedGrader

 

PBS TeacherLine uses the Canvas Learning Management System for its full array of online undergrad and graduate courses. Here are some tips shared among us in our course faculty forum.

 

 

 


One of the best features of Canvas is SpeedGrader. Canvas wizard Dave Pelino offers these insights regarding Canvas in general and the SpeedGrader feature in particular:

“Canvas is very user friendly, especially with SpeedGrader. When you are in a discussion forum, if you click on the “Settings cog” in the upper right hand corner of the forum directions (to the right of the “edit” button) the drop down menu will give you a SpeedGrader option there as well. Once you open that you can see all the posts for each of your individual learners. You can also grade from there and enter your feedback.

Another way to get there is to click on a grade for any student under a discussion forum column in the grade book, when the box opens there is a SpeedGrader option in it. 

A third option will allow you to see everything a learner has submitted fairly quickly – open the grade book and click on the learner’s name. A list of all assignments will appear and as you click on any of them you will see either the submission (if it was an assignment) or all their posts at once (if it was a forum).  You can also grade and leave comments from here.

Using the back button quickly brings you right back to that list. If you click “Show All Details” on the grade page it will even show all feedback you provided and any comments the learner left for you.

Thanks, Dave, for sharing these efficient tips for SpeedGrader!

For more information, view this Speedgrader post from the Canvas forums.

#PBSTeachers


 

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