Teague's Tech Treks

Avoiding tech "OOPS-idents" by Helen Teague

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ July 28

A poem begins as a lump in the throat, a sense of wrong, a homesickness, a lovesickness.

Robert Frost

 

ButterflyFlutterHelenTeague

 

 

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More Weekend Ed. Quotes

Image Source- Photo by Helen Teague

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Juan Felipe Herrera named 21st Poet Laureate of the United States

Juan Felipe Herrera has been named as the 21st Poet Laureate of the United States in an announced appointment by James H. Billington, the Librarian of Congress. Herrera’s term will take place from 2015 to 2016. (GalleyCat)

A poet of Chicano descent, the 66-year-old has spent just about his whole life on the West Coast. Born to a family of migrant farmworkers, Herrera bounced from tent to trailer for much of his youth in Southern California, eventually studying at UCLA and Stanford.

Herrera will succeed current Poet Laureate Charles Wright. Herrera is the poet who wrote “Border-Crosser With A Lamborghini Dream” and “187 Reasons Mexicanos Can’t Cross The Border,” among many other poems. (NYT)

Herrera’s biography and a few poems are available at this link from the Poetry Foundation. Herrera’s book page is available at this Amazon link.

The laureate position involves crafting poetry projects and broadening the audience for poetry. The 2013-2014 poet laureate, Natasha Trethewey, launched a series of reports from locations nationwide for a PBS NewsHour poetry series to explore societal issues. (HuffPost / AP)

Dating back to the 1300’s in Italy where the first poet laureates were named, over a dozen countries continue the poet laureate tradition today. The first U.S. poet laureate was Joseph Auslander. Ten U.S. states also name their own poets laureate.

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Of books and frigates and school change

Can you write something today that will be referenced in a future technology that you can’t even fathom?

Emily Dickinson did.

In a letter she wrote in 1873, she included the lines that would become known as her poem, “There is no frigate like a book.” This morning, 142 years later, I heard Dr. Jack McManus, professor in Pepperdine University’s GSEP, reference it in his TED Talk, “Schools of the Future: Time to Develop Your Metaphor.” It is so interesting to me that Dickinson’s editors “fixed” her poems and published them after her death in order to conform to more “regular” language usage of the time.

The curriculum-based lesson connection is: How would you retool Dickinson’s metaphor for technology? or life today?

But, the enduring value question rotates back to the question Dr. McManus’ posed at his TED talk:

How do you and I change the metaphor for schools?

Read the poem. Listen to the talk. And help start / continue the conversation.

There is no Frigate like a Book
By Emily Dickinson

There is no Frigate like a Book
To take us Lands away
Nor any Coursers like a Page
Of prancing Poetry –
This Traverse may the poorest take
Without oppress of Toll –
How frugal is the Chariot
That bears the Human Soul –

 

Schools of the Future: Time to Develop Your Metaphor: Jack McManus at TEDxManhattanBeach

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If you are an English teacher and would like more of the history of Emily Dickinson’s poems and the revisions they endured after her death, click to Tim Gracyk‘s You Tube video here
Source: The Poems of Emily Dickinson Edited by R. W. Franklin (Harvard University Press, 1999). Retrieved from: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/182908

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National Poetry Month Resources from ReadWorks

Our friends at ReadWorks sent a reminder that April is National Poetry Month. Inspire a love of poetry and improve your students’ reading comprehension with our collection of poems at different levels for K – 12th grade.

K – 12 Poems & Question Sets for National Poetry Month

Each poem, or pair of poems, comes with an evidence-based question set that can help move your students to comprehension. Like all ReadWorks curriculum, they are based on the highest-quality research on reading comprehension.

Please consider moving within all grade area specifications—don’t feel confined to stay just within your grade area. ReadWorks has chosen so many great poems that transcend grades and ages.

Have fun with poetry!

National Poetry Month

Additional National Poetry Month posts

 

 

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Weekend Ed Quote~December 6

This weekend’s quote is a poem by Longfellow, especially pertinent during the last days of this turbulent semester:

The heights by great (folks) reached and kept
Were not obtained by sudden flight;
But they, while their companions slept,
Were toiling upward in the night.
Standing on what too long we bore,…
With shoulders bent and downcast eyes,
We may discern-unseen before-
A path to higher destinies!
~Longfellow, Updated

 

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Additional Weekend Quotes

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