Teague's Tech Treks - 10 Rep Learning

Learning Technology & Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Tweet of the Week! February 17 2020

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ January 31

“What if we were willing to suspend the notions that teacher-focused, batch processing is the best we can do in the 21st century for students whose entry points, cultures, interests, languages, and perspectives quite literally span the globe?”
~Carol Ann Tomlinson

 

 


Tomlinson, C. (2018). Foreword. In: Westman, L. Student-Driven Differentiation. Corwin Press, p. xiii.

 

~~~

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STEAM Differentiation Jeopardy Week 4

STEAM Differentiation STEAM Challenge Question (Week 4)

 

 

 

#STEAM  #CUNE606

Click here to see all STEAM Differentiation questions


References:

Basham, J. D., & Marino, M. D. (2013, March). (PDF) Understanding STEM Education and Supporting Students … Retrieved January 8, 2020, from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/275353986_Understanding_STEM_Education_and_Supporting_Students_through_Universal_Design_for_Learning.

 

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STEAM Differentiation Jeopardy Week 3

STEAM Differentiation STEAM Challenge Question (Week 3)

 

 

#STEAM  #CUNE606

Click here to see all STEAM Differentiation questions


References:

Basham, J. D., & Marino, M. D. (2013, March). (PDF) Understanding STEM Education and Supporting Students … Retrieved January 8, 2020, from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/275353986_Understanding_STEM_Education_and_Supporting_Students_through_Universal_Design_for_Learning.

 

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Differentiation:  Are you a Crab or a Mola Mola?

Differentiation:  Are you a Crab or a Mola Mola?


Differentiating curriculum means using different methods so that students can acquire, apply, analyze, and synthesize new content, ideas, approaches, and solutions.

How can we respond to the challenge of differentiating curriculum for all learners?

Perhaps a recent tour of the Monterey Bay offers insights into professional practice preferences and the efficacy of each.

The Monterrey Bay includes 34 species of marine mammals, more than 180 species of seabirds and shorebirds, at least 525 species of fishes, and an abundance of seaweeds (Link).

Two of these species are the Decorator crab and the Mola Mola fish.

Decorator crabs that inhabit the kelp beds of the Monterey Bay hid their spindly appendages by attaching bits of kelp and other sea materials to their bodies. Decorator Crabs do that so that they can camouflage and blend in to their surroundings. They work with almost “most human and purposeful process” (Bateson, 1889).  The Decorator Crabs of the Monterey Bay rarely leave their warm, coastal environment. Rarely will you find a Catch of the Day special of Decorator Crab on the menu. 

The Monterey Bar sometimes is the weekend getaway destination of the Mola Mola. Mola Molas are strange fish who live in the dark, open, deep waters of the ocean. They can grow from baby birth weight of a few ounces to the size of a Mini Cooper (2200 pounds)! Their flat, buffet-table-sized torso attracts all types of parasites. When Mola Molas are invaded by too many parasites, they float higher and toward the Monterey Bay so that other shallow water fish such as the half-moon fish can pinch and dislodge the pa

If this modification strategy is not completely successful, then the Mola Mola rises even closer to the surface of the Monterey Bay and tilts on its side. This seafood platter position attracts a seagull who happily pecks the parasites in exchange for a lunch fast-food lunch.

The Mola Mola has learned different strategies to reach its goal of harmony. 

Does the problem-solving approach of the Decorator Crab or the Mola Mola appeal to you? 

In meeting the needs of all learners, are you more likely to blend-in to your school environment and cover yourself with excuses, packed schedules, and one size fits all teaching practices in order to avoid learning and implementing new instructional methods for differentiation? 

Or does the variety of problem-solving approaches of the Mola Mola fit your approach to differentiation?

Baby Beluga! That’s a whale of a metaphor to consider!

 

Reference
Bateson, William (1889). “Notes on the Senses and Habits of some Crustacea”. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. new series. 1: 211–214. doi:10.1017/S0025315400058045.

Monterey Bay Aquarium https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/visit/monterey-area/monterey-bay-national-marine-sanctuary

Photos of Decorator Crab and Mola Mola Fish are from Wikipedia

 

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STEAM Differentiation Jeopardy Week 2

STEAM Differentiation STEAM Challenge Question (Week 2)

STEAMDifferentiationJeopardy2

 

#STEAM   #CUNE606

 

Click here to see all STEAM Differentiation questions


Reference

Basham, J. D., & Marino, M. D. (2013, March). (PDF) Understanding STEM Education and Supporting Students … Retrieved January 8, 2020, from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/275353986_Understanding_STEM_Education_and_Supporting_Students_through_Universal_Design_for_Learning.

 

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STEAM Differentiation Jeopardy Week 1

STEAM Differentiation STEAM Challenge Question (Week 1)

STEAM Differentiation Jeopardy Wk1

 

 

#CUNE606

Click here to see all STEAM Differentiation questions


 

Reference
Gaskins, N. (2016). The new face of STEAM [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/blog/the-new-face-of-steam-nettrice-gaskins

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Digital-Age Best Practices

 

Read the Latest Research

Digital Age Best Practices – ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/…/3+Digital+Age+Best+Practices.pdf

TEC544Week53DigitalAgeBestPractices (2)-1s34y3j

 

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CCE Finland: Panel Discussion and Twitter Chat on Assessment Part 1

CCE Finland: Panel Discussion and Twitter Chat on Assessment


It is a career highlight to serve on a panel discussion addressing assessment.

My Basic Question regarding assessment is “How Do We Know if They Are Getting Better at Learning… and we do we blame if they Aren’t?”     

🙂                                                                            

JohnBarell-How Do We Know They're Getting Better

 

My question comes from my colleague John Barell who has written a book by this same title.

I asked this question to my national teacher professional groups and I received answers from many of them.

How do we know if we are sufficiently preparing the students of today for the challenges of the 21st century? Inquiry-based education leads to problem-solving and provides specific steps for pre, formative and summative assessment that informs instruction of 21st century skills.

 

 

Included in Dr. Barell’s book are examples that show how to use today’s technology in the classroom and how to use inquiry to develop and assess students’ ability to:

  • Think critically and creatively
  • Collaborate with others
  • Become self-directed learners
  • Adapt and become resourceful
  • Develop a sense of leadership, responsibility, and global awareness

Click this link for more information about Dr. Barell’s book

My PLN was a great resource of information. I received information, advice, and resources from educators in 10 states. Special thanks to Dr. Joyce King who provided so many timely resources.

One thing that stood out to me was the amount of summative assessment that currently occurs in U.S. classrooms. Specifically, testing days in the U.S. average 50 days out of 180 of state-standardized events plus 10 teacher-generated summative course-specific events per semester (20) for a total of 70/180 = 39%. The 39% figure does not count other forms of assessment such as formative assessment, reflection, student self- assessment, etc…

  • As educator Dr. A. Cross notes,”there is too much testing- and we are assessing the wrong things! The state level tests in Tennessee were given too early in the year for teachers to cover everything that was assessed for that grade, but then the results didn’t come back for months (over summer) so that data wasn’t used to improve teaching and learning- more as a punishment for educators when students scored poorly”-and- “they have a test as they leave grade 5 that heavily determines which middle school they can get into. Parents hire private tutors to give their students a leg up, which artificially inflates scores.”
  • As educator I. Ramirez explains, “we just find out that our school in Clark County will be rated (range 1-5 star school) base on student ACT performance. Therefore, our school system regarding standardized testing must change if we want to accomplish a 5 star rating. From now on students (freshman- Junior years ONLY) will be practicing 3-5 times per year taking a computer based test called CERT (CERT (College Equipped REadiness Tool). The output data from the student’s results will give us a prediction of how we’re doing as a school. In our math classes, for example, our warm up activities are ACT practice released problems. We want our students to get familiar with standardized testing vocabulary. We want our students to be considered proficient. In Clark County, ACT average composite scores are about 18 points. To be considered proficient, students must score 22 or more on the composite results. We know it will be a great challenge, however, myself I’m excited to fase this challenge. We know it will be a process to switch around from the low proficient to the proficient status, and also we know it may take some time to accomplish this academic goal, because we can do vertical alignment instruction. What I think is the real challenge is to create a culture of students interested to do well on these standardized assessments.
  • Upon reflection, educator Dave P. shared that “New York State implemented a ‘teacher assessment program’ and if teachers do not pass it they are put on probation and can be removed the following year if they do not show improvement – regardless of tenure. What I found interesting about this is that student assessment involves regurgitation of facts on multiple choice tests, even if the test includes open ended questions or work there is always a MC section. The teacher assessments require the observation of student involvement in the learning process, open ended questioning, Bloom’s Taxonomy, and other measures that go beyond the mere memorization of facts… [this] shows the state understands students need to do more than memorize facts, but this doesn’t match up to student assessments. Dave continues with this observation, “another part of the “teacher assessment” was that your students show “growth” over the year. So, to do this many teachers give impossible (“impassible”) BENCHMARK tests at the beginning of the year and compare the results on the final exam. Not exactly supported by science. My point; it’s all a game and depending on how you play it you can win without trying.
  • Jean H. provides a tidy summation and call to action.
    “When instructional practice is in alignment with the science behind the assessment, students and teachers can greatly benefit. That is where true differentiation of instruction that is impactful and uniquely perfect for each child is possible...currently, that is about as rare as a unicorn.”

Special thanks to these helpful folks:  John Barell, Dr. Joyce King, Dave P., Dr. Ashley CrossI. Ramirez, Jean H., Mark Barnes, Sylvia Ellison, Lev Vygotsky, Donald Schon, and Paulo Friere.

Check the blog tomorrow for my Top Ten Take-aways from the Panel Discussion.

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Digital Tools & Resources for the Elementary Classroom 


Looking forward to returning to Santa Fe, NM Public Schools for PDExperts’ Educational Professional Development!

We learn together! My Day 1 Topic: Digital Tools & Resources for the Elementary Classroom

Session Description: Technology Enhanced Learning involves acquisition and use of digital literacy, differentiated instruction, and authentic assessment strategies. In this session, you will work individually and with others to review a wide variety of websites curated for elementary instruction. You will exit the workshop with greater insight on which digital resources are a best fit for you and your students’ learning needs.

Would you and your schools like innovative PD? Message Me!

 

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