10-Rep Learning ~ Teague's Tech Treks

Learning Technology & Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ January 2, 2021

“The foundation you stand on today was built yesterday to reach toward tomorrow.”
~Joe Bastardo, meteorologist

Dazzling diamonds of Trumpler 14

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image features the star cluster Trumpler 14. One of the largest gatherings of hot, massive and bright stars in the Milky Way, this cluster houses some of the most luminous stars in our entire galaxy. From “What Did Hubble See on your Birthday?” https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/what-did-hubble-see-on-your-birthday 

 

 

 


 

 

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Nerd Research Minute: #STEAM up Reading with Drawing

Summarizing with Drawings: A Reading-Comprehension Strategy
by Janine Elliott
Science Scope, v30 n5 p23-27 Jan 2007

Available from NTSA: National Science Teaching Association

 

Description: When teachers ask their students to read something in class, they often encounter students who just wait for everyone else to finish reading before they do. These type of students are the ones most likely to dislike reading and they are just content to wait it out. Teachers may counteract this by requiring students to answer questions in writing or by requiring them to skim the reading until they find the answers. In this article, the author shares a strategy she developed to motivate students and engage them in the reading process. Her strategy requires students to read an article and then draw pictures that summarize the main ideas of what they had read. (Contains 6 figures and 6 resources.)
“When students summarize by drawing they must form a visual representation of the information they’re trying to convey. This provides an opportunity for students to elaborate and encode the information in a personally meaningful way. In addition, drawing after reading encourages students to reflect on what they have read and allows time to process the information. In some cases, I found that students admitted reading more carefully when they knew they would have to draw. In essence, they paid more attention to what they were reading in order to be able to do the drawing activity afterward. Finally, drawing can be used as a motivational tool. My students generally found it enjoyable, partly because they felt it took less effort than having to complete a written summary.” ~Janine Elliott
A motivational strategy for students acknowledging that there is a personal value (drawing) attached to the task of reading. Elliott scientifically tested her strategy in class and describes the breakdown of specific data in this short article.  
Reference
Elliott, J. (2007). Summarizing with Drawings: A Reading-Comprehension Strategy. Science Scope30(5), 23-27.

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Merry Christmas!

merry-christmas

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Congratulations to my GCU scholars

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ December 18

ThomasSowellThinking

 

 


 

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What if you just want to draw?

In this TED Talk, “How a Boy Became an Artist,” Jarrett J. Krosoczka tells how he grew up to create beloved children’s books.

As one of my grad students wrote, “Jarrett Krosoczka mesmerized his audience…and me…as he picture talked through his life from the addicted artist that was his mother through the punctuated moments his teachers and grandparents made, to significant events like art lessons and a video camera, to his first publishing, and beyond. It appears that the teachers who impacted him were the ones who gave him the skills, his first grade teacher, and the teachers who gave him the opportunity to use his creativity in authentic ways, such as the cartoonist for the high school paper.”

Hope you agree!

 

 

TED Talk Video Link: https://www.ted.com/talks/jarrett_j_krosoczka_how_a_boy_became_an_artist?language=en

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ December 11

“I often tell young kids… don’t ever count yourself out. You’ll never know how good you are unless you try. Dream the impossible – and go out and make it happen. I walked on the moon. What can you do?” ~Astronaut Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon. 

 

 

 


 

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Nerd Research Minute ~ Ebooks

Remote Learning and Remote working has shoved and pushed us into learning and working online. That means that reading, writing, thinking, and creating often occurs online.
How does digital activity inform the affordance of Digital Reading and eBooks? 
“Digital will continue to grow for a while at least, and continue to exist, because it is becoming part of the world we inhabit at a level below our notice, no more remarkable than roads or supermarkets. E-books are here to stay because digital is, and quite shortly we’ll stop having this debate about paper vs. eBooks because it will no longer make a lot of sense.” (Harkaway, 2014).  
 
Harkaway, N. “Paper vs. Digital Reading Is an Exhausted Debate.” March 2014. Retrieved from http://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2014/mar/31/paper-vs-digital-reading-debate-ebooks-tim-waterstone

 


 

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ December 4

“At the beginning of each semester, I tell students that my economic theory course will deal with positive, non-normative economic theory. I also tell them that if they hear me making a normative statement without first saying, ‘In my opinion,” they are to raise their hands and say, ‘Professor Williams, we didn’t take this class to be indoctrinated with your personal opinions passed off as economic theory; that’s academic dishonesty.’ I also tell them that as soon as they hear me say, ‘In my opinion,’ they can stop taking notes because my opinion is irrelevant to the subject of the class — economic theory.” ~Dr. Walter E. Williams, Economics for the Citizen

 

 

 


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Dr. Walter E. Williams, Economics Legend

 there is a sad item in the news today…

Dr. Walter E. Williams, an Economics Legend passed away (March 31, 1936 – December 2, 2020). Dr. Williams was not only an Economist but also the John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of economics at George Mason University in Virginia. Dr. Williams was also an author and commentator in economics, education, and history. My Dad took us kids to hear him speak and/or listen to him discuss ideas when both were students at UCLA (in those days, university commons were like Malls of Ideas; there were many impromptu gatherings of people who would meet to just discuss topics and ideas). Growing up, in my family, our allowance was tied to choren and reading essays by great thinkers. Dr. Walter E. Williams was frequently on the reading list for the week. “Economics for the Citizen” remains a must read! In 2005, some of Dr. Williams’ essays were collected in a book, now digitized on Google Books, including a digital version of “Economics for the Citizen” 

Of the many quotes attributed to Dr. Williams, here are two:

“I personally believe that economics is fun and valuable. People who say they found it a nightmare in college just didn’t have a good teacher-professor. I became a good teacher-professor as a result of tenacious mentors during my graduate study at UCLA. Professor Armen Alchian, a very distinguished economist, used to give me a hard time in class. But one day, we were having a friendly chat during our department’s weekly faculty/graduate student coffee hour, and he said, ‘Williams, the true test of whether someone understands his subject is whether he can explain it to someone who doesn’t know a darn thing about it.’ That’s a challenge I love: making economics fun and understandable.” ~Dr. Walter E. Williams, Economics for the Citizen

 

This quote helped shape my teaching philosophy:

“At the beginning of each semester, I tell students that my economic theory course will deal with positive, non-normative economic theory. I also tell them that if they hear me making a normative statement without first saying, ‘In my opinion,” they are to raise their hands and say, ‘Professor Williams, we didn’t take this class to be indoctrinated with your personal opinions passed off as economic theory; that’s academic dishonesty.’ I also tell them that as soon as they hear me say, ‘In my opinion,’ they can stop taking notes because my opinion is irrelevant to the subject of the class — economic theory.” ~Dr. Walter E. Williams, Economics for the Citizen

Also, the correspondence between Dr. Williams and Dr. Thomas Sowell (another giant of critical thinking) is featured in the book “A Man of Letters” also available to read online at the GCU Library

Rest in peace, Dr. Williams

 

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