Teague's Tech Treks - 10 Rep Learning

Learning Technology & Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Primary Sources in the News!

Click this Link for the AP News Story

Click on the link for a Common Core correlated study guide from the Library of Congress —common_core LOC-1osmerk

Common Core Standards:
ELA, History, 6-8, 9:    Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.1
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.3
Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.5
Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.6
Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.7
Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.8
Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.9
Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.

 


More posts referencing Primary Sources

#PBSReaders4Life

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Newsela

Newsela is an online current event repository of over 1,000 current event articles in eight categories:

  • War & Peace
  • Kids
  • Science
  • Money
  • Law
  • Health
  • Arts
  • Sports

The articles feature differentiated interest levels and five different reading levels of students. Most articles include a summative comprehension quiz and lesson plans. The quizzes align to Common Core Standards eight different learning standards:

  • What the Text Says
  • Central Idea
  • People, Events & Ideas
  • Word Meaning & Choice
  • Text Structure
  • Point of View/Purpose
  • Multimedia
  • Arguments & Claims

Newsela pulls its articles from over forty different media sources such as the LA Times, the Chicago Tribune, the Washington Post, and the Associated Press. Most articles are translated into Spanish. Newsela offers both free and paywall access. Teachers collect article via “Binders.” With cloud storage features and the Newsela iOS app, students can access Newsela from school and home, library, mall, or even the skateboard park!

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This Day in History, May 14: Departure Day for Lewis and Clark

Here is an example of using historical data to teach to the Common Core Skills.

This excerpt is from Garrison Keillor’s The Writer’s Almanac for May 14, 2013. Numbers will appear beside every curricular juncture indicating a classroom infusion activity. All number are listed at the bottom of the excerpt.

It was on this day in 1804 that Lewis and Clark departed on their journey. Even though this was the official start date of the trip, it had taken years of preparation. (1)

Thomas Jefferson had been trying to send explorers to the American West for years. Back in 1785, when he was the Ambassador to France, Jefferson met a man named Ledyard. (2)  who had been born in Connecticut, wandered all over the East Coast, sailed with Captain Cook in the South Pacific, and ended up in Paris. Jefferson wanted to send Ledyard to explore out West, and they worked out an intricate plan for him to get to the West Coast via Russia. But the trip was a disaster — Ledyard walked 1,200 miles through Scandinavia and the Artic Circle, and managed to travel through most of Russia before an angry Catherine the Great had him captured and deported, so he took off for Africa, where he soon died. A few years later, in 1793, Jefferson was secretary of state, and he decided to try again. He organized an expedition under the charge of a French botanist and explorer named André Michaux, who wanted to travel from the Missouri River all the way to the Pacific. Eighteen-year-old Meriwether Lewis asked Thomas Jefferson to let him join Michaux’s expedition, but Jefferson said no. (3, 4) Unfortunately, the new French Minister to America, Edmond-Charles Genet, was scheming to increase hostilities between America and Spain, and Michaux ended up involved in the plot, and the expedition fell apart.

The third time around, Jefferson planned even more carefully. (5) He had now known Meriwether Lewis for years, and Lewis was his trusted private secretary, so Jefferson suggested that Lewis lead the trip. In January of 1803, Jefferson sent a secret letter to Congress to ask if they would fund an expedition — at a cost of $2,500. (6) They agreed, and Jefferson sent Lewis to learn the skills he would need from the best teachers — he studied surveying and mapmaking, botany, mathematics, anatomy, fossils, and medicine, each with an esteemed scholar. For his co-leader, Lewis chose William Clark, his former commanding officer in the army.

Lewis and Clark spent the winter before they departed near St. Louis at Camp Dubois, on the Mississippi River. (7) They gathered supplies, recruited more people, and in the final days, packed the boats. They had a long supply list, which included 25 hatchets, 10.5 pounds of fishing hooks and fishing lines, 12 pounds of soap, three bushels of salt, 45 flannel shirts, 15 pairs of wool overalls, 176 pounds of gunpowder, 130 rolls of tobacco and 4,600 sewing needles (the tobacco and needles were gifts for Native people they would encounter), a microscope, a telescope, two sextants, 15 .54-caliber rifles, and 50 dozen Dr. Rush’s patented “Rush’s Thunderclapper” pills — a laxative whose two main ingredients were mercury and jalapeños. (8, 9, 10) They fit all this and much more into three boats: one was a 55-foot Keelboat, a riverboat (11) that could be sailed, rowed, or poled; and two were pirogues, smaller flat-bottomed boats that were similar to big canoes, one painted red and one white.

Activities:

1.) Freewrite: Students freewrite on “A Time When You Made a Plan and Pursued It”
2.) Sequence of Events-Begin a timeline for the dates leading up to the exhibition.
3.) Historical Research/Biography
4.) Writing from a style guide (writing numbers in a sentence)
5.) Freewrite, Citing historical evidence: Students freewrite on “Mistakes are part of every effective plan”
6.) Short research: Research what $2500 would buy in today’s currency. What would an exhibition of this magnitude cost today?
7.) Geography: Plot locations on a map/Google Earth
8.) Technology: organizing items effectively in a list/Excel.
9.) Reading for Context Clues/Analyzing/Critical Thinking: Analyze the supply list. Determine the reasoning for the type and number of amounts included. For example: Why was there more gunpowder packed than food items? Why were tobacco and needles packed? Why were they considered gifts?
10.) Reading for Context Clues/Predicting/Research: What were “Rush’s Thunderclapper” pills? Why were mercury and jalapenos used in them? Would either ingredient be used today? What other home remedies were popular during the 1800’s?
11.) Short Research: Search for more information on Riverboats? Why were they used by Lewis and Clark? Are they still in use today?

 

What other activities would you include?

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Integrate Common Core Standards with PBS Learning Media

Looking to integrate the Common Core State Standards into your teaching this year? Let PBS LearningMedia support your efforts. Start with these featured resources, then sign up for full access – anytime, anywhere:

Different Kind of Fuel, Grades 6-12 Use the specialized vocabulary presented in this video clip to help your students build proficiency while learning about the massive energy source that is the sun.

What’s the Author’s Purpose? Animal Shelter , Grades 3-8 This lesson plan explores the role of animal shelters. Use the video clips and informational text with your students to explore the impact of words and the writer’s point of view.

Analyzing Information – Can Pigs be Pets? Grades 3-12 Invite your students to compare and contrast their own points of view with those presented in the video. What are the pros and cons of having pigs as pets?

Garden Spiders, Grades 3-6 Introduce you class to six varieties of spiders in a busy garden ecosystem. Ask each student to take brief notes and evaluate the information.

Facing It, by Yusef Komunyakaa, Grades 7-12 This veteran and contemporary poet shares his poem about the Vietnam Memorial. Ask your students to analyze the style and purpose of the text. What makes it powerful?

An Egg is Quiet, Grades PreK-1 Use this illustrated story to practice text comprehension with your students – as well as encourage their language and vocabulary development.


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Tech BFF: Common Core Achieve the Core

BFF is an acronym for “Best Friend Forever.” These websites and tips are so good that they will become your technology BFFs!

My online graduate students find the “close reading of text” one of the most daunting of the Common Core initiatives. I have begun a small series about Summarization and Close Reading of Text.

Achieve the Core has dynamic reading samples and exemplar texts for Grade 3 and Grades 6-12. Wonderful examples ready for your review and implementation.

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Common Core Planning Sheet

Common Core Planning System, a free download for you

commoncoreplanningsheet

Source

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Common Core curricula changes

Tools to help you and your staff stay up-to-date on Common Core curricula changes from Scholastic. Easy to read and implement…takes Common Core away from common chore…click here to read the full article

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May Spotlight Website

Common Core State Standards:
Building on the excellent foundation of standards states have laid, the
Common Core State Standards are the first step in providing our young people
with a high-quality education. It should be clear to every student, parent, and
teacher what the standards of success are in every school.

See Other Resources from the OOPS: Our Overnight Planning System webpage

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