Teague's Tech Treks - 10 Rep Learning

Learning Technology & Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Nerd Research Minute: Video Games Before Bedtime

Does Playing Video Games Before Bedtime Affect Sleep?
Jeffrey A. Miskoff , Moiuz Chaudhri , Benjamin Miskoff

 

Abstract
Sleep serves a vital role in our ability to function on a daily basis and may be affected by various activities such as playing video games. Teenagers are one of the largest consumers of video games and if played before bedtime may lead to the release of certain neurotransmitters which may, in turn, alter sleep architecture and reduce sleep efficiency. The purpose of this study is to
measure 1) sleep efficiency 2) sleep latency 3) time spent in rapid eye movement (REM) stage with and without playing video games 30 minutes to 60 minutes before bedtime. For this study, one patient was recruited. The study was completed using a television, video game console, and a video game (Red Dead Redemption 4), Apnea Risk Evaluation System (ARES) nocturnal
polysomnogram (NPSG) unit, a bed and a blanket situated in a quiet room, a computer, printer, and a notebook for data recording. REM time and sleep latency were also measured. There were 45.6 minutes of REM with video games and 56.4 minutes of REM without video games. This was equivalent to 13.06% and 15.74% of the total sleep time, respectively. The sleep latency with
video games was shorter than without video games (11.4 and 23 minutes, respectively). Result suggests that there is no significant difference in sleep efficiency with and without video games. However, sleep latency decreased, and REM increased with video games.

 

Study Reference

Miskoff, J. A., Chaudhri, M., & Miskoff, B. (2019). Does Playing Video Games Before Bedtime Affect Sleep?. Cureus11(6). VideoGamesMiskoffChaudhriMiskoff2019

 

#PBSReaders4Life
#GCUTEC520

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Nerd Research Minute ~ August 6: Cognitive vs. Non-Cognitive Skills

This is a time when just about everything, from what we eat, to synthetic fibers for clothing, to prosthetic body parts can be grown or created in a laboratory.

In the learning laboratory that is the public or private school classroom is it also possible to grow a millionaire?

In his post, “Why Smart People are Not Necessarily Rich,” Dan Lattier discusses the distinctive difference between “Cognitive Skills” and “Non-Cognitive Skills” and their role in occupational success.

Lattier’s post features the research of a team led by James Heckman. Dr. Heckman describes the distinctive nature of personality in non-cognitive skills:

“Grades reflect not just intelligence but also what Heckman calls ‘non-cognitive skills,’ such as perseverance, good study habits and the ability to collaborate—in other words, conscientiousness. To a lesser extent, the same is true of test scores. Personality counts.” ~ Dr. James Heckman

Many of you are probably unsurprised by these findings. In today’s education system, those with a relatively modest intelligence have the ability to achieve straight-As simply through persistence. And though being “smart” certainly helps on standardized tests, students can close the gap between a low score and a high score through careful preparation and employing proven test-taking strategies.

The drive to get good grades and test scores translates well to the people-pleasing environment of the modern workplace, and to making money in that environment.

But then there’s the question of the desire behind that drive, which neither Heckman nor the Bloomberg article mentions. Discussing this will students, listening and affirming their responses, and encouraging inner drive can enhance not only the teacher-student dynamic but may very well, “grow” the next millionaire.

 

 

Reference
Borghans, L.Golsteyn, B., Heckman, J., Humphries, J. (2016). What grades and achievement tests measure

 

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Nerd Research Minute February, 2019: Research-based support for doodling as an imprint for reading comprehension

BookClockResearch-based support for doodling as an imprint for reading comprehension

Encouraging students to journal and doodle while they read is an excellent way to strengthen comprehension (Durkin, 1978; Karten, 2017; Schott, 2011).

Research support new ways of applying what students do while they read with avenues for future instructional activities.

Journaling/Doodling/Mindmapping is a wonderful modification for students with dyslexia and/or ADD/ADHD, or those students whose reading fluency is slower.

One student in one of the high school classes I taught was very sensitive to activity, movement, changes in routine, and changes in voice. Taking notes required too much channeling of energy so we came up with the idea of doodling and mindmapping his notes. His parents were astounded at the transformation in his calmer energy level and ability to retain comprehend what he read.

Also, among the older adults I work with who have survived a stroke, doodling and visual representation of their thoughts has been described by them as “nurturing” and “like a vacation.” In addition to our course reasources, much additional research points to these same effects and I have cited three of my favorites. (Durkin, 1978; Karten, 2017; Schott, 2011).

So, build in some doodling time this week or at least before Spring Break!

#PBSReaders4Life

#PBSReaders4Life

 

References

Durkin, D. (1978). What classroom observations reveal about reading comprehension instruction. Center for the Study of Reading, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Available online at this link: https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/17858/ctrstreadtechrepv01978i00106_opt.pdf?sequence=1 

Karten, N. (2017). Doodle your way to improved focus and concentration. TechWell. Available online at this link:
https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/17858/ctrstreadtechrepv01978i00106_opt.pdf?sequence=1

Schott, G.D. (2011). Doodling and the default network of the brain. The Lancett. VOLUME 378, ISSUE 9797P1133-1134. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(11)61496-7

 

 

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Nerd Research Minute October 8, 2018: Adjuncts’ Participation in Online Discussion Forum Discourse

 Show hospitality to one another without grumbling. 1 Peter 4:9

The word, “Hospitality” may be considered quaint and belonging to a “vintage” past, but it holds great meaning of invitational welcome. Although originally referring to welcoming others to our homes, might “hospitality” extend to online venues as well?

In other words, Is it possible to practice hospitality in online environments?

Growing up in California, there was always someone(s) arriving for a visit. Hospitality meant that there was someone ready to greet, something ready to eat, and something ready to do for all who came to visit. At least two out of three of those same principles are embedded throughout the GCU participation manual and applicable for online courses, especially in the following:

Ready to Greet/Something to Do:
1.) “Active engagement through weekly discussion forum contributions on 4 out of 7 days or 5 out of 7 days” (p. 8) provides both the academic and social support needed for students’ active engagement (Dolan, 2011; Hrastinski, 2009) and social connectedness (Diep, et al., 2018) in our online courses.

(2.) “Post an introduction to the Class Wall. Respond to all student introductions on the Class Wall” (p. 4) and accompanied by the Class Wall Introduction Template (p. 4-5) provides a Ready to Greet and Something for Students to Do as they long on to the course with a helpful scaffold template so students do not have to wonder how to succeed.

(3.) Although “Responsiveness” is listed in the Classroom Management section (p.5) of the Online Faculty Policy Manual, it is also an important component of online invitational hospitality and being engaged online. Responding quickly to students’ posts is a very important facilitation technique throughout a course but especially in the opening days of class.

Responsiveness is also imperative for technology issues that may arise for students. I believe in specific bread crumbs to help students log-in and participate so, in my online courses, I create a “Help Forum” with my “Course F.A.Q.’s” which are clear, concise instructions for issues that may arise or have happened in previous courses. Important information, such as my contact information, the course calendar, due dates, assessment rubrics, and assignment checklists provide necessary scaffolds that bolster students’ comfort levels and communicate hospitality.

I intently watch the course forums, my email, and students’ responses to my Introduction Forum to make sure that there is active presence and discussion. I respond to every student by name and I pick out threads of commonality or interesting items in their introduction. I asked students to also reply to each other by name and sign every post. These practices continues throughout the course. Sometimes, intensive guided practice is needed for students who are new to online courses or to the LMS. Lately, I’ve found that a quick Skype or Zoom session where I can share my screen with students is very effective.

Additional Something to Do: Participating with and involving students in building online collegiality is a catalyst for constructivist communities of practice online, (Lave and Wenger, 1998; Wellman and Gulia, 2018). Toward this goal, I create online Scavenger Hunts in Google Docs and short 30-second games in Quia or Educaplay to encourage light-hearted course and colleague participation.

The adult learners we serve are busy, over-scheduled, and often completing course assignments late at night and on the weekends. As instructors, we when follow engaging participation policies, we invite them into a safe, accessible, welcome space, and we set the stage for invitational learning. Through these behaviors, we approach the valuable goal of practicing online, invitational hospitality.

Your Turn: Do you think it is possible to create hospitable online spaces and/or online discussion forums?

If so, would you share your ideas?

 

References:

Diep, A. N., Zhu, C., Cocquyt, C., De Greef, M., & Vanwing, T. (2018). Adult learners’ social connectedness and online participation: the importance of online interaction quality. Studies in Continuing Education, 1-21.

Grand Canyon University (2013). Online Faculty Training Policy Manual: Retrieved from: https://cirt.gcu.edu/documents/frc/on_demand_workshops/mentor_recertificatoin/online_faculty_policy_manual_031513_v3_1pdf

Hrastinski, S. (2009). A theory of online learning as online participation. Computers & Education52(1), 78-82.

Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice. Retrieved June, 9(2).

Wellman, B., & Gulia, M. (2018). Net-surfers don’t ride alone: Virtual communities as communities. In Networks in the global village (pp. 331-366). Routledge eBook.

 

 

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Nerd Research Minute ~August 15 ~ Ed. Benefits of Twitter

Twitter is one form of  digital and computer-mediated form of peer-to-peer engagement that functions with both communicative and outreach potential. Students enrolled in higher education institutions report that Twitter “provided space and opportunities to engage in academic activities as a new pedagogical tool” (Bista, 2015, p. 1). Our Canvas LMS also has a Chat Feature that can function as a intra-course micro version of Twitter.

Additional research confirms that social media application such as Twitter and the Canvas chat feature “aids students in building relationships, fosters students’ connections with each other, and allows them to create meaning through sustained communication” (Chapman, 2015, p.1).

Further, research by Bartosik-Purgat, Filimon & Kiygi-Calli, 2017Junco, Elavsky& Heiberger, 2015, and Prestridge, 2014, indicate that there is a powerful constructivist teaming between instructors and students as they tweet and retweet course content, perspectives, and discussions on Twitter. This student- teacher and student-student engagement reinforces our enhanced Community of Inquiry framework (Hamm, Edwards, King, 2018) and student learning outcomes (Junco, Elavsky, and Heiberger, 2015Prestridge, 2014).

Here are some recommendations for using Twitter or the Canvas Chat feature in your course:

  1. Model your own use of social media features for your students
  2. Set criteria for the social media use in your  course
  3. Create and share a hashtag for your course and/or content (lectures, discussions, resource-sharing, etc…)
  4. Positively affirm your students as they follow you and as they participate with the social media components of your course
  5. Read more tips from Educause

The best pedagogy is the one that is inclusive and meets learners where they are located.

References: 

Bartosik-Purgat, M., Filimon, N., Kiygi-Calli, M. (2017), Social Media and Higher Education – An International Perspective,Economics and Sociology, Vol. 10, No 1,
pp. 181-191. DOI: 10.14254/2071-789X.2017/10-1/13.

Bista, K., 2015. Is Twitter an effective pedagogical tool in higher education? Perspectives of education graduate studentsJournal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Vol. 15, No. 2, April 2015, pp. 83 – 102. doi: 10.14434/josotl.v15i2.12825.

Chapman, A. (2015).  Tweeting in Higher Education: Best Practices, (2015). Retrieved from https://er.educause.edu/articles/2015/9/tweeting-in-higher-education-best-practices.

Junco, Reynol C.,  Elavsky, C. Michael  and Heiberger, Greg., (2013).  Putting Twitter to the Test: Assessing Outcomes for Student Collaboration, Engagement, and SuccessBritish Journal of Educational Technology, Vol. 44, No. 2 (March 2013): 273–287.

Prestridge, S. (2014). A focus on students’ use of Twitter–their interactions with each other, content and interface. Active Learning in Higher Education15(2), 101-115.

 

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Note: this post originally written by Helen Teague and published on the HSU Online Ed blog.

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Nerd Research Minute ~ Benefits of Gratitude

Gratitude: it feels good to say “thank you” and grandma would nod in approval, but is there a research benefit to backup Grandma?  In eight different studies, gratitude was shown to reduce feelings of depression (Lambert, N. M., Fincham, F. D., & Stillman, 2012). Research has also revealed that a gratitude practice lessens anxiety and may help lessen the experience of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Vernon, Dillon & Steiner, 2009).

Gratitude is catalyzed positively when we choose to reframe what happens to us in positive terms.

It improves sleep (Wood, Lloyd & Atkins, 2009) which in turn has a positive impact on mood. And anxiety. And just about everything. It improves overall cardiac health (DuBois, et al., 2012), both indirectly through improving mood and attention to positive health behaviors like fitness and nutrition as well as directly through reduction in inflammation.

It strengthens memory (Ramirez, et al., 2014). For elderly adults, practicing gratitude was shown to improve their overall sense of well-being and quality of life. And who wouldn’t want that?

 

 

References

DuBois, C. M., Beach, S. R., Kashdan, T. B., Nyer, M. B., Park, E. R., Celano, C. M., & Huffman, J. C. (2012). Positive psychological attributes and cardiac outcomes: associations, mechanisms, and interventions. Psychosomatics53(4), 303-318. PMID: 22748749 DOI: 10.1016/j.psym.2012.04.004

Lambert, N. M., Fincham, F. D., & Stillman, T. F. (2012). Gratitude and depressive symptoms: The role of positive reframing and positive emotion. Cognition & Emotion26(4), 615-633. PMID: 21923564 DOI: 10.1080/02699931.2011.595393

Ramírez, E., Ortega, A. R., Chamorro, A., & Colmenero, J. M. (2014). A program of positive intervention in the elderly: Memories, gratitude and forgiveness. Aging & mental health18(4), 463-470. PMID: 24229346 DOI: 10.1080/13607863.2013.856858

Vernon, L. L., Dillon, J. M., & Steiner, A. R. (2009). Proactive coping, gratitude, and posttraumatic stress disorder in college women. Anxiety, Stress, & Coping22(1), 117-127. PMID: 18791902 DOI: 10.1080/10615800802203751

Wood, A. M., Joseph, S., Lloyd, J., & Atkins, S. (2009). Gratitude influences sleep through the mechanism of pre-sleep cognitions. Journal of psychosomatic research66(1), 43-48. PMID: 19073292 DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2008.09.002

 

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Nerd Research Minute – August 6 – Reducing Distance Online

Repost from Education Dive: 

Reducing ‘distance’ is key to online learner success at this link: https://www.educationdive.com/news/reducing-distance-is-key-to-online-learner-success/521166/

Responsiveness and individualized feedback addressing learners by name are just two of many practices that build a bridge that erases distances in distance learning.  Methods to close the “transactional distance,” or the space felt between a faculty member and a student in the learning process, include opportunities for in-class dialog, peer-to-peer video, text exchange, and/or exposure to campus culture.

 

Source:

Carter, J. (April, 2018). Reducing ‘distance’ is key to online learner success. Education Dive blog, retrieved from: https://www.educationdive.com/news/reducing-distance-is-key-to-online-learner-success/521166/

 

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Nerd Research Minute – July 16 – Wowsa Stats on the Demand for Data

A small data collection on the enormity of the data spectrum

 

*The demand for data doubles every two years.
Source: https://qz.com/472292/data-is-expected-to-double-every-two-years-for-the-next-decade/

 

*Each minute, there are 4 million YouTube video views.
Source: https://merchdope.com/youtube-statistics/  and Nat Geo

 

*The consumption of data resulted in new words to measure it such as petabyte, which is a million gigabytes or 10 to the 15th power or 10,000,000,000,000,000

petabyte

Source: http://www.bendtechsupport.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Gizmodo-Petabyte.jpg

 

*3.4 petabytes of data are consumed every 60 seconds.
Source: Nat Geo’s Drain the Oceans

 

*Let the force be with the Yottabyte which is one septillion bytes and larger than the zettabyte

 

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Nerd Research Minute – April 30 – Data Use in Higher Ed

A survey conducted by Unit 4, a systems management company that serves higher education institutions, reported that 81% of the 150 IT decision-makers respondents said their institutions invest in technology to support student success objectives, but only 37% use data and analytics to support student outcomes.

Link: https://www.educationdive.com/news/how-to-make-data-a-part-of-an-institutions-culture/518938/

 

 

 

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Nerd Research Minute – March 1 (ID w/Beaton’s)

A Key Research-based principle for instructional design:
Beaton’s five key design principles of student-centered learning

Perceived interplay between flexible learning spaces and teaching, learning and student wellbeing

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10984-017-9254-9

Abstract

In recognition of the evolving learning needs of twenty-first century school students, changes to teaching practices and the incorporation of technology are increasingly accompanied by modifications to the built classroom environment. Typically rows of desk and chairs are replaced with a range of furniture that can be configured in various ways to facilitate teaching and learning. This article explores the perceived relationship between these flexible learning spaces and teaching, learning and wellbeing outcomes. The perceptions and experiences of 12 school principals, 35 teachers and 85 students from four primary and four secondary schools in Australia were examined. Flexible learning spaces were reported to facilitate student-centred pedagogy and selfregulation, collaboration, and student autonomy and engagement. Modified spaces were reportedly more enjoyable, comfortable and inclusive and allowed greater interaction. The findings are discussed in light of Beaton’s five key design principles of student-centred learning environments to explore the connection between the physical classroom environment and teaching and learning. Self-Determination Theory is used to interpret how elements of the physical space facilitate the creation of a social environment that encourages greater motivation to learn and increases student wellbeing. The research contributes to an understanding of how flexible learning spaces are used and with what effect, thereby addressing a present gap in the literature.

Keywords

Autonomy Collaboration Engagement Learning environment Physical environment Student-centered Well-being

 

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