Teague's Tech Treks

Learning Technology and other Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Learning Technologies Podcast- Sept 10 – History Example

Learning Technologies Podcast- Sept 10 – History Example
Topic: World War II  Atlantic Wall

 

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Podcast Transcript

Lily: Welcome to Emily and Lily’s Podcast!

Emily: Today’s topic is The Atlantic Wall from World War 2

Lily: The Atlantic Wall was a massive building effort ordered by Adolph Hitler. The “Atlantic Wall” spanned almost 2,000 miles, in Norway, along the Belgium and French coastline to the border with Spain. The Atlantic Wall contained 19 million tons of steel and concrete, minefields, all kinds of weaponry, and concrete bunkers for 300,000 soldiers. 260,000 workers, and, of course, all kinds of weaponry and minefields.

Emily: The Atlantic Wall was Germany’s defense from invasion along the western coast of Europe and Scandinavia against invasion of mainland Europe by Great Britain and the Allies of World War II. It was completed in May of 1943.

Lily: The Germans had highly experienced men, heavy infantry weapons, and powerful anti-tank capabilities to defend the Atlantic Wall. Germany assumed the attack would most likely occur in Normandy, France and they concentrated their efforts at this location. There was some controversy about the building of this wall as French construction companies were hired to build much of it, then after the war these same companies were hired to reconstruct the area or take it down. The construction workers were not prisoners and at first were able to go home on Sundays, but after the Battle of Stalingrad they were fenced into a work camp with barbed wire. Those working the wall were paid a minimal wage for the work they carried out.

Emily: The allies bombed the Germans’ occupied territories relentlessly, day and night. An invasion was eminent. In 1943 Field Marshal Erwin Rommel took over command of the Atlantic Wall construction.

Lily: Soon Rommel realized that he wasn’t going to prevent an invasion, but rather he needed to use the Atlantic Wall to prevent the Allied forces from gaining ground quickly during their invasion through Europe. So General Rommel built up a defense of over 6 million landmines and gun emplacements along roads away from beaches. Rommel set slanted poles with pointed tops to stop gliders and parachutists and did everything he could to defend the beaches.

Emily: Rommel’s realization was correct. The Allied forces did attack on June 6th, 1944 at the beaches of Normandy, France. This day was better known in history as D-Day or Operation Overlord.

Lily: General Dwight D. Eisenhower was the Commander of the Allied troops. More than 160,000 Allied troops landed at Normandy, France and breached the Atlantic Wall. More than 5,000 ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the invasion giving the Allies the foothold that German General Rommel feared. The Atlantic Wall was effective to some point as the cost to the Allies was high: over 9000 Allied casualties.  By nightfall of the first day, British, American, and Canadian infantry divisions forced Hilter’s troops to retreat.

Emily: The Atlantic Wall was built to stop an Allied attack on Nazi occupied Europe. Remnants of the Atlantic Wall still exist today although it has fallen into disrepair. Many structures have fallen into the ocean, some have been demolished, and others have been dismantled.

Lily: In recent years historians have begun movements to preserve the remaining structures in order to preserve the memory of what existed during World War II.

Emily: This has been “Emily and Lily’s Podcast.” Join us again next time!

Please leave a comment and let’s keep the discussion going.

(This podcast Created using Audacity) 
Additional Resources from Edublogs

 

 

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Learning Technologies Podcast – August 30- Do We Need a GPS to Find Our Classrooms?

Learning Technologies Podcast – August 30- Do We Need a GPS to Find Our Classrooms?

1:27

 

Podcast Transcript:

Welcome to the Learning Technologies Podcast. Today’s topic is … Do We Need a GPS to Find Our Classrooms? This question emerged when I visited an EdTech discussion board hosting a discussion on the value of face-to-face training over eLearning, blended learning, and other types of training. The consensus seemed to be that there is room for training in F2F classrooms. These face-to-face classrooms were labeled as “controlled learning environments.”  I parked on the label of “controlled learning environments. Hmmm… I wonder, “are there really learning scenarios, outside of university research labs, that can accurately be classified as “controlled learning environments” and if so, do we really want these? Do we want learning to be controlled, or, in the spirit of socio-cultural learning, do we want another outcome? Also, can we expand the definition of classrooms to extend beyond four plastered and/or windowed walls?

Thank you for considering these questions with me. I enjoy learning from you! Please leave a comment and let’s keep the discussion going.

 

(This podcast Created using Audacity) 
Additional Resources from Edublogs

 

 

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Learning Technologies Podcast- July 24 -RIP MS Paint :(

 

 

Podcast Transcript:

Welcome to the Learning Technologies Podcast. Today’s topic is …Microsoft MS Paint.  Microsoft is dropping various features and functionalities from its new build. In preparation for the release of the Fall Creators Update, Microsoft has published the full list of stories that will be removed or depreciated from the new build.

MSPaint will be sorely missed. It was the gateway for new and vintage computer nerds.

What is your reaction to Microsoft’s decision? Are there other applications and programs that we should also mourn?

Thank you for considering these questions with me. I enjoy learning from you! Please leave a comment and let’s keep the discussion going.

(This podcast Created using Audacity) 
Additional Resources from Edublogs

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Learning Technologies Podcast-May 17-Participatory Partnerships 1: Meet and Greet

Learning Technologies Podcast-May 17-Participatory Partnerships 1: Meet and Greet

 

Participatory Partnerships Tip 1: Meet and Greet to Begin Great Partnerships. Start with the familiarity of a Meet and Greet away from your workspace where your learners/faculty/students/colleagues work and learn. For online partnerships, this means, meet at a time and in a meeting space platform that is convenient for others.

https://media.giphy.com/media/5wWf7GW1AzV6pF3MaVW/giphy.gif

 

More Participatory Partnerships

Podcast Transcript:

3:01

Welcome to the Learning Technologies Podcast. Today’s topic is Participatory Partnerships. I’m designing a training series for university professors and business leaders on the value of public sphere pedagogy and participatory partnerships. For the next few weeks of this summer, you will see ten specific tips on research-based best practices for creating your own participatory partnerships. Although my training will focus on partnerships between university professors and business leaders, participatory partnerships have many, many couplings. They can include connections between community businesses, community outreach groups, K-12 schools and the neighborhood community, K-12 schools and outreach groups at the  city, local, and state level, partnerships between school and community, school and family, students and teachers, classrooms families in the U.S. and global counterparts.

For all types of Participatory Partnerships, start with the familiarity of a Meet and Greet away from the workspace of your team of learners/faculty/students/colleagues. This does not necessarily mean that the meeting has to cost a lot of money and be off-site, retreat-style (although who wouldn’t love to meet offsite in Hawaii!). Meet and Greet away from your workspace can mean outside, in front of your building, in a conference room down the hall, at your onsite coffee cart, or perhaps in the commons area or park across the street. For online partnerships, what is important is to meet at a time that is convenient for everyone or almost everyone and that the meeting occur in a meeting space platform that is convenient for as many of your partnership participants as possible. For both onsite and online participatory partnerships, record your meeting and make the recording available for those who were unable to meet and for all of us who need reminders of what was discussed. This is the first Participatory Partnerships Tip: Meet and Greet to Begin Great Partnerships.

Podcast Note: If you find this podcast after the summer of 2017, you will find all the Participatory Partnerships listed under the content tag, “Participatory Partnerships” at this blog.

(This podcast Created using Audacity) 
Additional Resources from Edublogs

Gif Source

 

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Learning Technologies Podcast – April 10- Primary Sources and their Use in Digital Reading

Learning Technologies Podcast – April 10- Primary Sources and their Use in Digital Reading

 

2:55

Podcast Transcript:

Welcome to the Learning Technologies Podcast. Today’s topic is … Primary Resources and their Use in Online Courses. This podcast occurs in conjunction with my facilitation of PBS TeacherLine’s Online Course in Digital Reading.
Primary sources are the raw materials of history — they are the original documents and objects which were created at the time under study. They are different from secondary sources, accounts or interpretations of events created by someone without experience. Examining primary sources gives students a powerful sense of history and the complexity of the past. Helping students analyze primary sources can also guide them toward higher-order thinking and better critical thinking and analysis skills.

Resources matter. How we reflect on them matters too. Sometimes our students get caught up in their impression of what is said and who is saying it. They mix their opinion of the source with what the person may or may not be trying to communicate. But students of Historiography tell us this does not change the efficacy of the resource itself.

For example, last year, there was a renewed interest in Ireland on the events of the 1916 Easter Rising, also referred to as the Rising. Researchers are returning to primary sources such as journals, diaries, death records, and cemetery listings to discover that many more people died than previously thought in the uprising for Irish Independence from Britain. One historian, Ray Bateson continues to search for a comprehensive listing of the previously unrecognized heroes of the Rising. Although records of the Irish Easter Rising are scant in the United States’ Library of Congress, they are included and it is significant to note that the importance of Primary Resources is part of global endeavors. 

Perhaps the best benefit of online courses is the time given (and even encouraged) for reflection and consideration. So, consider with me- Is there a place for primary sources in courses delivered online and, if so, what does this mean for citing sources and pointing students to primary sources?

Thank you for considering these questions with me. I enjoy learning from you! Please leave a comment in our Week 3 discussion board to keep the discussion going.

(This podcast Created using Audacity) 
Additional Resources from Edublogs

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Back to School~Incorporate Podcasts

BacktoSchoolAs you return to school, consider tranferring your printed resources into podcasts.

Here is a podcast by Tremaine Jackson and  Deborah Tarsiewicz explaining the growing popularity of the genre, Steampunk novels. What I like is the transferability of your hardcopy texts to Web 2.0 tools such as Podcasts. As explained in a previous post on podcasts, I like Pod-0-Matic, a free podcast conversion utility.

Give a listen:

Some uses for Podcasts:
website greeting for parents
daily/weekly class annoucement on your website or blog
student projects –poem recitations, stories, biographies, summaries of novels, historical periods, current event
weekly “TeacherTalk” diaglogue starring you and a colleague

General Tips for Podcasts:
keep language concise, direct, and lively
keep podcasts short…less than 4 minutes
add texture with music, sound effects

Great source for Podcasts:
Library of Congress–my personal favorite
Scientific American
iTunes
Podcast Alley
PodOMatic

click here to read more about incorporating social media in your classroom (pdf download)

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