10-Rep Learning ~ Teague's Tech Treks

Learning Technology & Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ October 8

Fisher Frye, and Hattie Quote

 

 


More Weekend Ed. Quotes

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Technology in Practice Model by Orlikowski

References

Orlikowski, W. (1992). The duality of technology: rethinking the conceptof technology in organizations. Organization Science, 3(3), 398–427.

Orlikowski, W. (1993). CASE tools as organizational change: investigating incremental and radical changes in systems development. MIS

     Quarterly, 17(3), 309–340.

Orlikowski, W. (2000). Using technology and constituting structures: a practice lens for studying technology in organizations. Organization

      Science, 11(4), 404–428. https://www.dhi.ac.uk/san/waysofbeing/data/data-crone-orlikowski-2008b.pdf 

Orlikowski, W., & Iacono, S. C. (2001). Research commentary: desperately seeking the ‘IT’ in IT research—a call to theorizing the IT artifact.

      Information Systems Research, 12(2), 121–134.

Orlikowski, W., & Robey, D. (1991). Information technology and the structuring of organizations. Information Systems Research, 2(2),

       143–169

See also

Week 4 Technology In Practice Model_copy
https://4oops.edublogs.org/files/2021/09/Week-4-Technology-In-Practice-Model_copy.pdf

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ August 27

“Math literacy is the key to 21st century citizenship.” ~ Robert Moses, The Algebra Project

 

RobertBobMoses

 

 

 


More Weekend Ed. Quotes

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Happy Independence Day!

Happy Independence Day!

July 4th has fallen on a Sunday 34 times since 1776. The first July 4th Sunday was 1779 and the last was 2010, while the next will be 2027. Seward began continuously celebrating on Saturday, July 4th of 1868 and has done so 22 times on a Sunday. The bi-centennial July 4th celebration of 1976 was on a Sunday.

CSPAN rebroadcasted a May 17, 2021 Book Chat with Patrick J. O’Donnell who discussed his book, The Indispensables

Here is the link: https://www.c-span.org/video/?511872-1/the-indispensables The Indispensables

The Indispensables follows O’Donnell’s previous book, Washington’s Immortals, also an exceptional read of an important period of history.

Washingtons Immortals

 

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ Poetry for Independence Day

Good Night

Carl Sandburg

Many ways to spell good night. Fireworks at a pier on the Fourth of July

        spell it with red wheels and yellow spokes.

They fizz in the air, touch the water and quit.

Rockets make a trajectory of gold-and-blue

        and then go out. Railroad trains at night spell with a smokestack

        mushrooming a white pillar. Steamboats turn a curve in the Mississippi crying

        in a baritone that crosses lowland cottonfields

        to a razorback hill. It is easy to spell good night.

                                     Many ways to spell good night.

 


This poem is in the public domain. Published in Poem-a-Day by the Academy of American Poets.

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Memorial Day – 2021 – More than a 3-day weekend

the debt we owe

 


Archived post

 

“We Live in the Wind and the Sand and Our Eyes are on the Stars” ~ WASP Motto

WASP Motto

Image Found Here: http://www.robinsonlibrary.com/history/history/worldwar2/wasp.htm

The Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP), (also Women’s Army Service Pilots or Women’s Auxiliary Service Pilots) were a civilian women pilots’ organization, whose members were United States federal civil service employees. The 1074 members of WASP became trained pilots who tested aircraft, ferried aircraft and trained other pilots. Their purpose was to free male pilots for combat roles during World War II. The WASP museum is located on Avenger Field in Sweetwater, Texas.

The WASPs flew more than 60 million miles flying planes out of 192 bases. One pilot, Gertrude “Tommy” Tompkins Silver was the only Women Airforce Service Pilots’ member to go missing during World War II. On October 26, 1944, Tompkins piloted her plane from a foggy runway on Mines Field, adjacent to the Los Angeles airport, and was not heard from again.

WASPs with PT-19, the first plane usually flown in primary training. Women on far left in dark glasses is Gertrude “Tommy” Tompkins, according to Texas Women’s University Libraries WASP Archives.

WASPs with PT-19, the first plane usually flown in primary training. Women on far left in dark glasses is Gertrude “Tommy” Tompkins, according to Texas Women’s University Libraries WASP Archives.

 

Mr. Frank Jacobs , a retired aerospace engineer from Manhattan Beach, California has a haunting childhood memory of seeing a plane crash into the Santa Monica bay that day. He still dives to find Gertrude “Tommy” Tompkins as poart of the  Missing Aircraft Search Team. Read his account at this link from the Deep Explorers’ blog: http://www.deepexplorers.com/history/last-missing-wasp/ 

In July, 2008,  President Obama signed legislation finally granting WASPs the Congressional Gold Medal, in recognition of their service. In honor of Memorial Day, May 27, it is important to remember all who served for the United States.

The 2017 Young Adutl (YA) book  Seized by the Sun written by Jim Ure tells the life story of Gertrude “Tommy” Tompkins

 

 

 

More more information on the brave WASP pilots, click to the Robinson Library history page.

 

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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Observance

MLKQuoteReDarkness

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New Year’s Literary Resolution ~ Part 2

Yesterday’s post addressed a literary New Year’s resolution practice of setting a specific number of books to read for 2021. This is a fund, collaborative class project too. 

Today’s post includes a review of one of the books on my reading list from the end of 2020 and the first few days of this year.

The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust BowlThe Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl by Timothy Egan
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This book made such an impression, that I ordered it mid-way through the audiobook (audiobook via Hoopla through my library). Yes, one dismissive point-of-view can be that it is depressing. Another point-of-view also is the resilience of spirit of Americans. I choose the latter p.o.v.

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New Year’s Literary Resolution ~ Part #1

Improve upon the usual New Year’s Resolutions to forego carbs and embrace exercise, by setting a reading goal of books for 2021. According to the Pew Research Center, the average person in the U.S. reads about 12 books per year. You may decide to vary your Literary Resolution with more or fewer books, include audio and e-book titles as well. MentalFloss (2019) has a fun “test” to speculate the number of books to read.

Goodreads has the most effective reading challenge support. Goodreads combines analytics with book descriptions, reviews, community encouragement, and reviews. (See tomorrow’s post for a book review activity for you and your class.) Already, Goodreads has over 2 million readers participating in the 2021 Reading Challenge!

GoodreadsChallenge

 

My Goodreads Reading Challenge for 2021

 

Please consider a Literary Resolution for 2021!

 

References

Debczak, M. (2019). This Test Will Tell You How Many Books You Can Read in a Year. Mental Floss. https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/570929/how-many-books-to-read-year-test

Perrin, A. (2019). Who doesn’t read books in America? Pew Research Center. https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/09/26/who-doesnt-read-books-in-america/

Who doesn’t read books in America?

 

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Nerd Research Minute: #STEAM up Reading with Drawing

Summarizing with Drawings: A Reading-Comprehension Strategy
by Janine Elliott
Science Scope, v30 n5 p23-27 Jan 2007

Available from NTSA: National Science Teaching Association

 

Description: When teachers ask their students to read something in class, they often encounter students who just wait for everyone else to finish reading before they do. These type of students are the ones most likely to dislike reading and they are just content to wait it out. Teachers may counteract this by requiring students to answer questions in writing or by requiring them to skim the reading until they find the answers. In this article, the author shares a strategy she developed to motivate students and engage them in the reading process. Her strategy requires students to read an article and then draw pictures that summarize the main ideas of what they had read. (Contains 6 figures and 6 resources.)
“When students summarize by drawing they must form a visual representation of the information they’re trying to convey. This provides an opportunity for students to elaborate and encode the information in a personally meaningful way. In addition, drawing after reading encourages students to reflect on what they have read and allows time to process the information. In some cases, I found that students admitted reading more carefully when they knew they would have to draw. In essence, they paid more attention to what they were reading in order to be able to do the drawing activity afterward. Finally, drawing can be used as a motivational tool. My students generally found it enjoyable, partly because they felt it took less effort than having to complete a written summary.” ~Janine Elliott
A motivational strategy for students acknowledging that there is a personal value (drawing) attached to the task of reading. Elliott scientifically tested her strategy in class and describes the breakdown of specific data in this short article.  
Reference
Elliott, J. (2007). Summarizing with Drawings: A Reading-Comprehension Strategy. Science Scope30(5), 23-27.
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