10-Rep Learning ~ Teague's Tech Treks

Learning Technology & Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Memorial Day Weekend ~ Monday

red Poppy in cemetery

http://www.greatwar.co.uk/poems/john-mccrae-in-flanders-fields.htm   

In Flanders Fields

by John McCrae, May 1915

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

American Legion Family - National Poppy Day

 

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                                                   References

 

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Memorial Day Weekend ~ Sunday ~ the Soldier’s Psalm

red Poppy in cemetery

http://www.greatwar.co.uk/poems/john-mccrae-in-flanders-fields.htm

The 91st Psalm:
“Those who live in the shelter of the Most High will find rest in the shadow of the Almighty.
This I declare about the Lord: He alone is my refuge, my place of safety, He is my God, and I trust Him. For He will rescue you from every trap and protect you from deadly disease.
He will cover you with His feathers. He will shelter you with His wings. His faithful promises are your armor and protection.
Do not be afraid of the terrors of the night, nor the arrow that flies in the day. Do not dread the disease that stalks in darkness, nor the disaster that strikes at midday.
Though a thousand fall at your side, though ten thousand are dying around you, these evils will not touch you. Just open your eyes and see how the wicked are punished.
If you make the Lord your refuge, if you make the Most High your shelter, no evil will conquer you; no plague will come near your home.
For He will order His angels to protect you wherever you go.
They will hold you up with their hands so you won’t even hurt your foot on a stone.
You will trample upon lions and cobras; you will crush fierce lions and serpents under your feet!
The Lord says, “I will rescue those who love me. I will protect those who trust in my name.
When they call on me, I will answer; I will be with them in trouble. I will rescue and honor them.
I will reward them with a long life and give them my salvation.”

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Memorial Day Weekend ~ Saturday

The Significance of Red Poppies to Honor Those Who Gave The Ultimate Sacrifice

Red Poppies Graphics FairyRed poppies have been a symbol of the aftermath of battles. The pairing of Red poppies and mourning for soldiers’ sacrifice has been linked to the Napoleonic war when red poppies (Palaver rhoeas), would be observed growing over soldiers’ graves.
Professor Michael was professor at the University of Georgia at the time the war broke out, yet she took a leave of absence to volunteer at the New York headquarters of the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA). Two days before the armistice, Professor Moina Michael read the poem “In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae. The poem was published in the magazine, Ladies’ Home Journal.
Inspired by John McCrae’s poetic verses, in 1918, Professor Michael wrote her own poem in response, which she titled “We Shall Keep Faith.”

We Shall Keep the Faith
by Moina Michael, November 1918

Oh! you who sleep in Flanders Fields,
Sleep sweet – to rise anew!
We caught the torch you threw
And holding high, we keep the Faith
With All who died.

We cherish, too, the poppy red
That grows on fields where valor led;
It seems to signal to the skies
That blood of heroes never dies,
But lends a lustre to the red
Of the flower that blooms above the dead
In Flanders Fields.

And now the Torch and Poppy Red
We wear in honor of our dead.
Fear not that ye have died for naught;
We’ll teach the lesson that ye wrought
In Flanders Fields.

silk red poppies
Professor Michael gave fabric blooms to her academic colleagues to wear in remembrance of soldiers.  After the war ended, Professor Michael returned to the university town of Athens, Georgia, and thought about the best way to continue her practice of remembrance.
She began to craft and sell red silk poppies to raise money to support war veterans as they returned to the United States.
Over time, Professor Michael organized a campaign to create a national symbol for remembrance which would be a poppy in the colors of the Allied nations’ flags entwined around a victory torch. At the beginning of 1920, she secured a pledge from Georgia’s branch of the American Legion, to adopt the poppy (minus the torch) as its symbol.
In September, 1920, the National American Legion voted to use the poppy as the official U.S. National emblem of remembrance.
American Legion Family - National Poppy Day

                                                                 References
Pruitt, S. (2017). The WWI origins of the poppy as a remembrance symbol. History.com.
   https://www.history.com/news/world-war-i-poppy-remembrance-symbol-veterans-day

National American Legion (2021). The Poppy Story. https://www.legion.org/poppyday/history

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Weekend Quote ~ May 24

Memorial Day Significance

Originally posted by Donna K.G.

 

 

 


For weekly Ed. Quotes, please click here More Weekend Ed. Quotes

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Leaping Towards Leap Day ~ 2024

Leap Day

Do you know any Leaplings? That is a word to describe folks born on Leap Day.

Leap Day has become a fun and unique day that only revolves around every four years. 

Once every four years, people born on Feb. 29 actually get to celebrate their birthday.  Leap day and Leap Year is when an extra day is added every fourth year to help fix the problem that while our calendar year is 365 days, the solar year — the amount of time it takes the Earth to circle the sun — is 365.24219 days.

Leap Day was even the subject of a super funny episode of Frasier, during a Leap Year episode in 1996. In this episode, “Look Before You Leap,” Dr. Frazier Crane encourages his family and friends to Leap into a daring new practice in honor of Leap Day. 

When Frasier’s turn came to sing an aria at the PBS telethon, he choked! We pass around various versions of this excerpt in the faculty forums at our school.  Thought you might get a smile out of this one If you can find the Frasier episode (Season 3/Episode 16) that features Leap Day, it is fun to watch! 

Here’s a fun Leap Day math quiz that you may want to take and then share with your students! 

https://www.mathsisfun.com/leap-years.html

Happy Leap Day!

 

                                                                                      References

Frasier. (1996). Frasier Season 3 Episode 16 Look Before You Leap.

markapsolon. (2011, September 9). The haunting tape 14 (ghost caught on video) [Video]. YouTube.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6nyGCbxD848

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In Memoriam of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr. quote on Moving Forward

Please enjoy a safe remembrance day on Monday, January 16th

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Happy New Year 2023

Happy New Year 2023

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Creating a Class Recipe Infographic with Piktochart!


 

https://create.piktochart.com/output/56f99f4ef4b8-tec-521-summer-recipe-shares

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Memorial Day Remembrance

As Americans we celebrate Memorial day, each and every year.  Some gather at their homes with family and friends, some at cemeteries, and some at national monuments.  We, as Americans, honor this day to our fallen service men and women in uniform.  This is an important day for America and must not ever be forgotten. Many question the act of war, the death of many and length of some combats. That right is given to each of us, through the dedication and sacrifice of our military and their immediate family. Agree or disagree with all or some of our combats, we all can agree we dedicate today to our lost heroes. Their sacrifice was to ensure our freedom – We must treasure this freedom enough to live up to it.  They have ensured a free United States of America.
God Bless America.
Jim McShane

Memorial Day by JanetZ

Photo by Janet Zepeda

 

 


Additional Memorial Day posts

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Veterans’ Day 2021

“In this life . . . only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you. Christ and the American soldier. One died for your soul, the other for your freedom.” 

Teague flag

photo by Helen Teague

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