10-Rep Learning ~ Teague's Tech Treks

Learning Technology & Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ November 17

“Technology will not replace great teachers, but technology In the hands of great teachers can be transformational.” 

-George Couros

Technology Integration

 

 


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The longer you hold on to things, the heavier they become

Excellent Advice…

 

 

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“What if” Answers for Graduate Assignments

What if you do not understand an online graduate assignment?

Graduate-level assignments often feature layered tasks culminating in a final learning artifact. Graduate-level assignments are connected to a specific graduate-llevel rubric.

While everyone has their own process and strategy, sometimes you may run into a particularly challenging assignment. When this happens, here are a few steps that may offer help for what to do if you don’t understand a graduate assignment.

In General: Begin earlier than you may think is necessary to preview assignment tasks.

  1. Step 1: Read the Assignment Carefully. The first step to take when you don’t understand an assignment is to re-read it carefully. With layered graduate assignments, learning research suggests repetition. For example, It is best to read an assignment a couple of times, take a short break, then return to refocus and read the assignment again. Read the assignment rubric. Point values in rubrics indicate the assignment items with the most emphasis. Focus on these items.
  2. Step 2: Check for in-class supports from Dr. Teague. Then come back and read the prompt again, keeping any of your instructor’s in-class comments in mind. Looking at your assignment with fresh eyes will often help you either eventually understand the assignment or identify what specifically is confusing to you.
  3. Step 3: Break the assignment into manageable tasks. Some folks create an outline of the tasks or follow the steps provided in assignment instructions.
  4. Step 4: Set a schedule to complete each manageable task.
  5. Step 5: Begin the task with even the smallest activity, such as reading one or more of the Class Resources, taking notes, and summarizing what you’ve read.
  6. Step 6: Research the Topic.
  7. Step 7: Check out ideas with a Classmate/Course Peer.
  8. Step 8: Check for Understanding with specific questions for the teacher or professor.
    This step is listed after all the others because waiting for a reply from busy teachers and/or professors can prolong getting started and may cause procrastination and FOGS (Fear of Getting Started).

 

What are your thoughts? What steps would you add, delete, or revise? 

All the very best cognitive wishes for the successful understanding and completion of your upcoming graduate assignment(s)!

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ November 10

Plutarch asked, “Why do the Spartans punish with a fine the warrior who loses his helmet or spear but punish with death the warrior who loses his shield.” Because helmet and spear are carried for the protection of the individual alone, but the shield protects every man in the line.

SteveRoseBlog_Plutarch_Ssize

Honoring all the individuals who have served — and who continue to serve — in the U.S. military.
Verterans Day

Thank you for your service!

 

 

                                                                         References

Steve Rose Phd Counseling. 6 things veteran’s can teach us about life. https://steverosephd.com/what-veterans-can-teach-us-about-life/


Click here to view previous Veteran’s Day posts

 

 

 


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Video Review of Constructivism and Constructionism

Here is an updated video review of the Constructivism and Constructionism Learning Theories.

The video features a Microsoft digital storytelling app for creating interactive presentation called Sway. Here is the Sway link if you would like to scroll through at your own pace: https://tinyurl.com/TeagueSwayPVP

Vimeo video link: https://vimeo.com/teaguetech/piagetvygotskypapert?share=copy

 

Please note: This is a video excerpt from a Webinar I gave for graduate students and presented onsite in Tampere, Finland and Dublin, Ireland. This is a very low-tech, summary version of a much longer conference presentation. Participant questions and discussion are edited and gaps may be present. The video has been edited for time and content. Some edits are choppy and will never win awards. 🙂

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Word Clouds – More Uses for Constructivist Learning

This post addresses more uses of Word Clouds for Constructivist Learning opportunities.

Word Clouds are visual representations for text data, typically used to depict keyword metadata (tags) on websites or other digital documents. What counts with word clouds are the frequency with which a word is used. Word clouds are also known as Tag Clouds.

Word cloud usage, design, and discussion offers multiple options for Differentiation. For concept retention, students (almost all ages), can collaboratively share 2-3 key words from reading assignments. The Instructional Leader can create a word cloud of the shares. Here is a recent word cloud of key words generated from a small group, university discussion on ethical practices in research design. This word cloud was made last night using MonkeyLearn.

ResearchEthicsWordCloud

Another favorite way to use Word Clouds is to help graduate students in their job searches. I copy the text of a resume and paste it into a Word Cloud Generator, such as MonkeyLearn. When I copy the text into a word cloud generator, common themes and experiences immediately appear.

professional competencies

For concept retention, students (almost all ages), can collaboratively share 2-3 key words from reading assignments. The Instructional Leader can create a word cloud of the shares. Here is a recent word cloud of key words generated from a small group, university discussion on ethical practices in research design. This word cloud was made using MonkeyLearn.

ResearchEthicsWordCloud

Small, student groups with digital access can also complete this process and create their word clouds. Word clouds can then be shared with discussion to follow on the similarities and differences.

Michael Gorman gives 108 additional ways to use Word Clouds in the Classroom in this post in 21st Century Tech.

  1. Put your lesson plan into a word cloud to create a word cloud of what you will be learning about. This could also be part of your entire course outline used at the beginning of a course.
  2. Paste a reading from your text into a word cloud. You may wish to turn off common words.
  3. Copy and paste a reading from the web into a word cloud. You may wish to turn off common words.
  4. Put vocabulary words into a word cloud.
  5. Use a word cloud to create a discussion either in class or posted on the web for a discussion forum. Try to create it so that a question of inquiry can be used.
  6. Create a group word cloud of the entire class or sub groups in the class. This could be in reaction to a discussion, an idea, a reading, or video. Students work in groups to come up with 20-30 descriptive words and then make a word cloud. Using advanced tools they could rank them or color code them.
  7. Each student creates a word cloud in reflection from a discussion, an idea, a reading, or video. Individual comes up with 20-30 descriptive words and then makes a word cloud. Using advanced tools they could rank them or color code them.
  8. Entire class creates a word cloud in reaction to a topic. In order to capture student word have them digitally input them using the Web 2.0 tools Write with Me or Google Forms.
  9. Have students create word clouds that generate understanding of a concept, standards or vocabulary word.
  10. Illustrate classroom thoughts or views using a word cloud to survey students. Favorite university, pro team, singer, etc.

 

 To read all Gorman’s suggestions, please Click here.

Learn More: 12 Valuable Wordle Tips You Must Read…Word Clouds in Education Series: Part 1

Please note: This is an updated post- Review/Read the Original post from August 17, 2012 

Here is another 10-Rep Learning blog post on the engaging power of word clouds:  Another post on Word Clouds

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ November 3

“the very notion of intelligence may be clouded by a myth: the belief that being intelligent means knowing what is out there…An alternative view, which is the base of mindfulness research, is that individuals may always define their relations to their environment in several ways, essentially creating the reality that is out there. What is out there is shaped by how we view it”
~Ellen Langer, The Power of Mindful Learning, p. 100.

 

The Power of Mindful Learning

 

 

                                                                              References

Langer, E. (2016). The power of mindful learning.  Da Capo Lifelong Books.  ISBN13: 9780738219080

 

 


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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ October 27

“Always try to associate yourself with whom you can learn something.
All the knowledge you want is in the world, and all you have to do is go seek it.”
~Marcus Garvey

Dialogics Image Source TCEA

 


More Weekend Ed. Quotes

#PeaceSchema #GCUTEC544 #GCUTEC595 #GCUTEC516 #GCUTEC521
#CUNE607 #CUNE604, #CUNE605
#PBSReaders4Life

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Weekend Ed. Quote ~ October 20

Every acquisition of accommodation becomes material for assimilation, but assimilation always resists new accommodations. ~Jean Piaget

TheoryLearningPractice

 

 

References

Piaget, J. (1955). The construction of reality in the child. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 19(1), 77

 


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PeaceSchema Session at GPLEC

GPLEC Session Announcement

 

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