Teague's Tech Treks - 10 Rep Learning

Learning Technology & Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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LinkedIn Learning: What I Learned Today

Special thanks to Christy Tucker for this share that addresses Storyline Interaction: Text Message with Scoring. Tucker’s approach has throughways to modularized microlearning. There are microlearning applications and adaptations to many curricular and ILT.  This is an innovative method for formative assessment for many learning avenues: soft skills curriculum, instructional coaching, business and professional writing… and more! Thanks Christy!!

See the full post at this link: https://www.christytuckerlearning.com/storyline-interaction-text-message-with-scoring/ 

MicroLearningExampleChristyTucker

Image by Christy Tucker

 

Not proficient with Storyline? Think of other digital options using survey software/apps, Google Forms, Google Sheets, Canvas LMS built-in quiz maker… or others! Please share your ideas in comments!

 

There’s always something to learn on LinkedIn!  #LinkedInLearning

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Free Access to Calm App for K-12 teachers

Any teacher with a K-12 classroom can gain free access to Calm, the #1 app for meditation and sleep AND get free access to Calm’s paid subscription service available on Android, iOS, and the web – a $59.99 value!

Teachers will score unlimited access to guided meditations and mindfulness exercises, including Calm Kids, which offers programs tailored for age groups from pre-K through high school. The goal of this initiative is to provide teachers with the tools and resources they need to help kids to develop a lifelong capacity for greater self-awareness, concentration, patience, and resilience.

If you’re a teacher, just head here and fill out a simple 30-second form and you’ll be approved within just a few days (it usually takes about 3 days to approve applications). Once you’re approved, you’ll receive a welcome email with further information on how to get started. And then you’ll start receiving tips, suggestions, and best practices to include mini breaks to your school day!

~Seen 1st at the TCEA blog.

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The Career Readiness Handbook Available Online

Today the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and the Texas Workforce Commission launched the Career Readiness handbook that is designed to help students in higher education identify and communicate their marketable skills as they prepare for the workforce after graduation.

Commissioner of Higher Education Raymund Paredes explained, “Texas’s higher education plan, 60x30TX, is a powerful and appropriate response to the changing nature of the U.S. economy and its job market. As the marketable skills goal states, we want all our undergraduate college students to graduate with marketable skills. This Career Readiness handbook is a guide to help Texans of all ages transition from student to employee, manager or entrepreneur.”

The Career Readiness handbook is part of collaborative efforts to help students improve their employability, and supports ongoing, complementary work in both agencies. Also, the Jobs Y’all career exploration campaign is an important advancement at the Texas Workforce Commission. Marketable skills are achieved through a variety of activities, including curricular programs, student leadership, volunteer efforts, internships, apprenticeships, and many other opportunities.

“We’ve listened to our state’s industry leaders and created an outreach campaign to meet employers’ needs by reaching our future workforce with an inspirational message that informs and inspires them to choose and prepare for exciting in-demand careers,” said Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) Chair Ruth R. Hughs. “The Jobs Y’all career exploration campaign raises awareness among students, parents, counselors and teachers about the strength of Texas industries in attracting our future workforce and secures Texas as the best choice for a 21st century workforce.

The Career Readiness handbook is available online at http://www.60x30tx.com/resources/reports/.

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Considering edTech Resolutions for the New Year

By now, most educators and students have made it to holiday break and through the frenzy of Christmas/Kwansaa/Hanukkah.

Many folks are considering Resolutions for 2019… what are your EdTech resolutions?

 

resolutionsTeagueTechTreksHere are a some ideas from popular blogs:

From 2017- Mimio Educator, by Kelly Bielefeld 

From 2017 – Houghton Mifflin Blog

From 2016 – Edutopia, by Heather Wolpert-Gawron

From 2013- Education Week, by Jennie Magiera

 

It’s time to look ahead and set some resolution goals. I’ll share my resolution goals next week. I’m keeping in mind the words of Heather Wolpert-Gawron, “Making resolutions is really about recalibrating our attempts to be the best teachers we can be.”

 

#EdTech resolutions

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Resolution Image Source

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Teague’s edTech Resolutions for 2019

Teague’s edTech Resolutions for 2019

Try to remember to restart my computer by Kelly Bielefeld

Set a regular schedule to keep my hardware charged

Brainstorm STEAM integration for use by Educators:

Develop engaging PD activities: One possibility: every teacher to our new breakoutedu.com escape room kit we recently purchased. We have a few innovative teachers who have already experimented with it, and have already seen an amazing level of engagement and thinking. All teachers need to experience the kit and see how easy it is to set up and how much the students love it.

Practice 20-20-20 to ease eye strain from too much screen time

Be more responsible with my screen time

Inclusivity for all teachers whether they are as Heather Wolpert-Gawron   describes, tech-tentative teacher or a tech-savvy one

Keep the Gee-Whiz factor that edTech provides

“Drop the word ‘tech.’ It’s just ‘education’ now” Mike Lawrence, CEO ofComputer Using Educators (CUE), past ISTE board member, and Director of the California Student Media Festival.

National Education Technology Plan https://tech.ed.gov/netp/

Boxlight: https://news.mimio.boxlight.com/launch-tech-successfully

 

What are some of your #EdTech resolutions? Add your answers to our DQ Forum!

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Nerd Research Minute – July 16 – Wowsa Stats on the Demand for Data

A small data collection on the enormity of the data spectrum

 

*The demand for data doubles every two years.
Source: https://qz.com/472292/data-is-expected-to-double-every-two-years-for-the-next-decade/

 

*Each minute, there are 4 million YouTube video views.
Source: https://merchdope.com/youtube-statistics/  and Nat Geo

 

*The consumption of data resulted in new words to measure it such as petabyte, which is a million gigabytes or 10 to the 15th power or 10,000,000,000,000,000

petabyte

Source: http://www.bendtechsupport.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Gizmodo-Petabyte.jpg

 

*3.4 petabytes of data are consumed every 60 seconds.
Source: Nat Geo’s Drain the Oceans

 

*Let the force be with the Yottabyte which is one septillion bytes and larger than the zettabyte

 

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More Nerd Research Minutes

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Don’t Let a Hacker Turn Your Summer Into a Bummer

DON’T LET A HACKER TURN YOUR SUMMER INTO A BUMMER

Summer is here and many students and faculty take to the roads, beaches, and parks…in other words to spots of respite beyond the computer screen.

But nefarious activity continues in the form of malware and phishing (pronounced the same way as the fun summer activity from a pier but far different!)

Don’t let a hacker or scammer turn your summer into a bummer.

cyber-2120014_640-1h0rm6yCreativeCommons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow these tips from The KnowBe4 Security Team for email protection:

Review the content of the email.

  • ​​Is the sender asking me to click on a link or open an attachment to avoid a negative consequence, or to gain something of value?
  • Is the email out of the ordinary, or does it have bad grammar or spelling errors?
  • Is the sender asking me to click a link or open up an attachment that seems odd or illogical?
  • Do I have an uncomfortable gut feeling about the sender’s request to open an attachment or click a link?
  • Is the email asking me to look at a compromising or embarrassing picture of myself or someone I know?

If you notice anything about the email that alarms you, do not click links, open attachments, or reply.

Have a safe and restful and cyber-secure summer!

 

NOTE: This post by Helen Teague reposted at https://hsutxonlineed.edublogs.org/2018/06/05/dont-let-a-hacker-or-scammer-turn-your-summer-into-a-bummer/

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Is Snapchat Linked to Learning Opportunities?

Recent headlines reference Snapchat, a 2011 multimedia messaging app created by Evan Spiegel, Bobby Murphy, and Reggie Brown:

Snapchat Wednesday introduced a new type of augmented-reality-enhanced interactive lens, Snappables, calling them the first shared AR experiences on the messaging application. (Adweek)

Also Wednesday, Snap’s stock tanked a day after the company acknowledged it’s testing a redesign of the Snapchat redesign. (Deadline)

Is there a way(s) to include Snapchat as a Mobile tech affordance in classroom, online, hybrid instruction? 

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Sharing Resources from the Library of Congress

PBS Teacherline’s course, Teaching with Primary Sources from the Library of Congress begins today (April 18), and I am grateful to facilitate this course!

This is a resource-rich course for educators, administrators, parents…anyone who wants to learn more about the Library of Congress and their resources. We also delve a bit into the topic of copyright, a timely topic at any time.

This post will be updated frequently as an archival record of the resources that we, as a class collective, discover as we explore the resources at the Library of Congresshttps://www.loc.gov/. Please feel free to join our participatory partnership- leave a comment, share a resource you find, and/or the way(s) you will include Library of Congress resources in your instructional practice. 


LOC portico

Library of Congress Blog: Selecting primary source documents for your classroom:
Part I
http://blogs.loc.gov/teachers/2011/07/selecting-primary-sources-part-i-knowing-your-students/
Part II
http://blogs.loc.gov/teachers/2011/07/selecting-primary-sources-part-ii-considering-historical-context/

Library of Congress Blog: Finding and use primary sources:
http://blogs.loc.gov/teachers/2012/05/library-of-congress-search-making-it-easier-to-find-and-use-primary-sources/

April 26 Update:
Jackdaws resource (David): https://www.jackdaw.com/p-292-japanese-american-internment-camps.aspx
BreakoutEDU:  https://www.breakoutedu.com/gamesold1/  (David)

April 27 Update: (Teague)
Interactive Primary Source Analysis Tool: http://www.loc.gov/teachers/primary-source-analysis-tool/  
May 5 Update: 

“Fair Use Is A Right” featuring the Dramatic Chipmunk

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Creating a media file from powerpoint: The Images of Aging Photo Contest

The 8th Annual 2017-2018 Images of Aging photo contest features endearing photos depicting active aging submitted by the best students at ACU, including Emily Adams We’ll announce the contest winners tomorrow!! Usually, we run a continuous feed powerpoint, but I wanted more of a video experience. Duplicating the upload process for the photos seemed… cumbersome.

I took my powerpoint and saved it as a Windows media file using the following steps:

  1. Open the powerpoint file
  2. Click “Save As” and give the file a name in the File name box
  3. Click “Windows Media Video” from the “Save as Type” dropdown list and then click “Save.” 
  4. Your PowerPoint presentation is now saved as a video file. 4.
  5. Run from your laptop or log in to social media accounts such as Facebook
  6. There will be a short delay while the file is uploaded and processed

 

1ImagesOfAgingPhotosAllPhotos- video opens in a new window

 

See more information at our “Images of Aging” blog.

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