Teague's Tech Treks

Learning Technology and other Tech Observations by Dr. Helen Teague

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Tech Infusion and its Potential to Mediate Online Identities

A recent ice storm caused my retreat from the roadways and outside activities. My indoor inertia was replaced with the indulgence of re-reading my online team process journals. These journals include observations, quotes of team members, ideas for future research, links to current research, and a few doodles. I remain committed to the learning power which emanates from doodles, but time to search for cooraborating research eludes me.

As I turned the paper pages of the journals a quote from an online research team member caught my attention. Our team, led by Dr. Eric Hamilton featured a conversation with Dr. Paulina Sameshima.

Dr. Sameshima’s dialogue during this particular meeting addressed how learners templatize thought for neural efficiency. Dr. Hamilton and Dr. Sameshima catelyzed a discussion on meaning-making.  My research teammate, in response said,

“We bifurcate on default”

My margin notes then echoed my astonishment at the level of understanding engendered from my research teammate. I wondered if the technological affordances of a synchronous meeting held within a communal space simultaneously shared through the online affordance of Fuze amid the separated environments of each of our individual locations coalescenced and liberated insights such as my teammate shared.

“We bifurcate on default”

There is a protection that emerges for online exchanges whether they be confined to formal learning spaces of online courses, webinars, and synchronous team meetings or informal learning spaces of chats, status updates, benchmark updates and the like. 

Both online participants and facilitators for new identities situated within the online community (Brown, et al. 1989; Ito, Kafai, Teague, 2017; Turkle, Wenger and Wenger, 2016). We may become a new version of ourself, embodying attributes of the self that are restricted or confined in the world of our face-to-face interactions. Through the participatory spontaneity of online discourse coupled with the identity safeguards of our physical environments, insights are formed and shared. Growth branches and, as Vygotsky wrote, this development precedes learning. 

 

Permenant Link: https://tinyurl.com/ParticipatoryOnlineIdentity 


Sameshima, P. (2007). Seeing red: A pedagogy of parallax: An epistolary bildungsroman on artful scholarly inquiry. Cambria Press. Amazon

 

Background polling supplemental research: As of January 2014: •  90 percent of American adults have a cell phone. •  58 percent of those have a smartphone (the number soars to nearly 80 percent for those between 18 and 49). •  42 percent have a tablet.1 It’s a truly different, more informed and more connected world. SOURCE: 1 – http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheets/mobile-technology-fact-sheet/

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Cookies and Computers~ Cookies Deserve QR Codes Too

It is the beginning of the “Spring” semester but with deep chill temps in the 20’s it sure still feels like winter. To nudge us toward a goal of warm welcomes and warm embraces toward to new Canvas LMS, we are inviting faculty to an event called “Cookies & Computers.”

Planning is in the final stages for the Office of Online Education team’s faculty event to encourage collegialty and participatory spontaneity. We’ve set the hashtag to . We may be live-tweeting during the event too.

I added a QR code to a couple of places that faculty and friends read everyday: the Smore flyer and my email signature.

cookiesandcomputersqrCodeTeague

I’m thinking about creating a short QR Code Bingo activity. Here is a stellar example created by Alice Keeler- here’s the link http://www.alicekeeler.com/2012/07/27/twitter-qr-code-bingo/

#HSUTXOnline

 

See more Cookies & Computers posts

 

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Planning for Teacher-Led Professional Development

Such collegial, collaborative learning on the Friday beforeThanksgiving ! Grateful for the educators in my planning session of
Thank you especially to the innovative program management of Jean Haverstick 
@Jean_Innovate and superb support from Angie I.‘s team‏.
KeyWordsPSDrTeague
ParticipatorySpontaneityTeague
Additional Posts referencing Participatory Spontaneity, click here

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Important words to remember re: risk and failure

Getting ready to return to Region One ESC for the second collaborative presentation on planning for Teacher-led Professional Development and Participatory Spontaneity.

In considering the planning phase of my Teacher-led professional development series, this sign, snapped at a previous PD event, has important reminders:

FirstAttemptAtLearning-

 

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2017 Global Education Conference

The 2017 Global Education Conference: https://www.smore.com/0h4rj-the-globaledcon-attendee-guide

Dates: Monday, November 13, 2017 at 12:00 PM – Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 3:00 PM (CST)

Organized by Lucy Gray & Steve Hargadon – The Global Education Conference Network/GlobalEd Events

Here is information on how to join in this exciting event! 

1) Go to this page to join the conference. You can see the schedule in your time zone:
http://www.globaleducationconference.com/page/sessions-and-schedule

2) This conference guide will provide all information you need for the conference.  Read it carefully and save it for future reference: https://www.smore.com/0h4rj-the-globaledcon-attendee-guide

3) Keynote speakers are listed here: http://www.globaleducationconference.com/page/2017keynotes

4) Consider joining the main community at http://globaleducationconference.com, and use the front page chat to ask questions.

 

My session, “Participatory Spontaneity: What Is It and How Can We Achieve It with Global Audiences Online?” – Helen Teague occurs Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at 5:00pm, United States Central Time (GMT – 6)

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Just added a new discussion on The Global Education Conference Network

Just added a new discussion on The Global Education Conference Network.
I am proposing to present:

Participatory Spontaneity: What Is It and How Can We Achieve It Online?

ParticipatorySpontaneityTeague

Would a session addressing Participatory Spontaneity be of interest to you?

Any volunteers to co-present?

Click here to learn more and/or submit your own idea(s) for a presentation: The Global Education Conference Network

Additional Posts on Participatory Spontaneity

 

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Thank you to Texas Region One ESC – Video

Thank you to Jean Haverstick and the talented administrators at Texas Region One ESC.

Our keyword phrase of “Participatory Spontaneity” embodied our day!!

#TMTexasESC1

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Participatory Spontaneity Blog Post by Dr. David Webster

Participatory Spontaneity is what I have observed is a key component of participatory professional development. Dr David Webster blogs about this in his blog post. #TMTexasESC1

Link: http://sco.lt/8U83Dl

 

 

 

 

#TMTexasESC1

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Participatory Spontaneity – Key Words

When observed, the engagement concept of Participatory Spontaneity resonates with the following key words:

KeyWordsPSDrTeague

The key that is the central concept for me is one I learned about over 30 years ago while in undergraduate courses.  My professor, Dr. Chantrey Fritts, emphasized the importance of Collegiality in teaching and learning. Collegiality is relational.

Collegiality is the relationship between colleagues (Link). Colleagues are those explicitly united in a common purpose and respecting each other’s abilities to work toward that purpose (Link).

Because of new media opportunities, our audience of colleagues grows beyond borders.

 

Additional Posts on Participatory Spontaneity

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Participatory Spontaneity- A Benefit of Online Discourse

Digital media and emerging technologies, especially social media, change the educational lives of students, teachers, administrators… and those who love them! The rush to add associations labeled as “Friends,” “Contacts,” “Followers,” “BFFs,” “Super BFF,” “Besties,” “Mutual Besties,” “Mutual BFs,” (and many more), reflects the desire to connect and interact.

The spontaneity of participatory discussion is fun. Using long and short discourse, conversationally toned text, even emojis and animated gifs, ideas sprout, grow, and transplant across minds and miles.

Through the experience of a knowledgeable educator, the spontaneity of participatory discussion achieves a heightened level of learner engagement.

Over the course of the next several weeks, I’ll be thinking and writing about The spontaneity of participatory discussion, or Participatory Spontaneity. I would love to learn about your experiences with Participatory Spontaneity too so please share comments.

ParticipatorySpontaneityTeague

 

 

Additional Posts on Participatory Spontaneity

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