Teague's Tech Treks

Avoiding tech "OOPS-idents" by Helen Teague

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Differentiating Math Lessons for a Range of Learners

Just a reminder that PBS TeacherLine is offering teachers a 30% discount on PBS TeacherLine’s newest math course, “Differentiating Math Lessons for a Range of Learners.” To save your spot, enroll by 11:59 PDT on 5/31 using promo code “PBS+MATH”. (NOTE: Applies only to the course starting 6/14.) http://to.pbs.org/2o9vPrn

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Great Online Course: Developing Passionate Readers in a Digital World

PBS TeacherLine’s course RDLA400 – Developing Passionate Readers in a Digital World is set to begin tomorrow, March 13th, with Introductions and Orientation.

In this course from PBS TeacherLine, you will explore the answers to essential questions of reading using digital resources. You will also learn the basic elements of and rationale for reading initiatives that inspire students to read independently. You will discover a wealth of online literature resources, gain a deeper appreciation for digital reading and audio technologies, and learn how author and genre studies inspire and motivate student reading. Moreover, you will explore your own personal reading habits and use this understanding to model passionate reading. All of these activities will occur in a collaborative, online professional learning network.

Please visit PBS TeacherLine website today to register!

PBSTeacherLineCourses

 

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PBS TeacherLine Online Facilitated Courses – Enrollment Open

Always Keep LearningPBS TeacherLine’s online facilitated courses are designed to benefit both beginning and experienced teachers! Topics include science, reading, social studies, math, instructional strategies, and instructional technology. Enroll now through August 19 and save 15% using promo code SUNNYDAYS*. Check Out Courses Available for Enrollment

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Primary Resources Matter

A Concluding Post for my PBS TeacherLine Online Course “Teaching With Primary Sources from the Library of Congress”:

Primary sources are the raw materials of history — original documents and objects which were created at the time under study. They are different from secondary sources, accounts or interpretations of events created by someone without experience. Examining primary sources gives students a powerful sense of history and the complexity of the past. Helping students analyze primary sources can also guide them toward higher-order thinking and better critical thinking and analysis skills.

Resources matter. How we reflect on them matters too. Sometimes our students get caught up in their impression of what is said and who is saying it. They mix their opinion of the source with source definition. But students of Historiography tell us this does not change the efficacy of the resource itself.

Bateson photoFor example, there has been a renewed interest here in Ireland on the events of the 1916 Easter Rising, also referred to as the Rising. Researchers are returning to primary sources such as journals, diaries, death records, and cemetery listings to discover that many more people died than previously thought in the uprising for Irish Independence from Britain. One historian, Ray Bateson continues to search for a comprehensive listing of the previously unrecognized heroes of the Rising (see photo below). Although records of the Irish Easter Rising are scant in the United States’ Library of Congress, it is significant to note that the importance of Primary Resources is part of global endeavors. 

Perhaps the best benefit of online courses is the time given (even encouraged) for reflection and consideration. How many times have I sat in a face-to-face classroom listening to the discussion and then as soon as I get to my car an idea screams to be included, but class is already over. Is that just my singular experience?

In Week 3, we will look at whether resources have to be codified only as Primary and Secondary. Wonderful insights and information this week! Looking forward to continuing on to Week 3!!!

Helen

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Happy Birthday Thomas Jefferson

On this day, April 13 in 1743, Thomas Jefferson was born in Shadwell, Virginia.

My favorite Jefferson quote is “In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.

The Miller Center website offers a brief biography of Thomas Jefferson.
In contrast, this Smithsonian perspective depicts a different personality side of Thomas Jefferson.

This PBS TeacherLine Crash Course episode offers students a synopsis of the life and legacy of our third U.S. president. http://to.pbs.org/1MX6Guq

 

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